Table of Contents for Prince


Niccolo Machiavelli to the Magnificent Lorenzo 3(2)
1 How many kinds of principalities there are, and in what manner they are acquired
5(1)
2 Of hereditary principalities
6(1)
3 Of mixed principalities
7(8)
4 Why the kingdom of Darius, which was conquered by Alexander, did not revolt against the successors of Alexander after his death
15(3)
5 How cities or principalities are to be governed that previous to being conquered had lived under their own laws
18(2)
6 Of new principalities that have been acquired by the valour of the prince and by his own troops
20(4)
7 Of new principalities that have been acquired by the aid of others and by good fortune
24(8)
8 Of such as have achieved sovereignty by means of crimes
32(5)
9 Of civil principalities
37(4)
10 In what manner the power of all principalities should be measured
41(3)
11 Of ecclesiastical principalities
44(3)
12 Of the different kinds of troops, and of mercenaries
47(5)
13 Of auxiliaries, and of mixed and national troops
52(4)
14 Of the duties of a prince in relation to military matters
56(3)
15 Of the means by which men, and especially princes, win applause or incur censure
59(2)
16 Of liberality and parsimoniousness
61(3)
17 Of cruelty and clemency, and whether it is better to be loved than feared
64(3)
18 In what manner princes should keep their faith
67(3)
19 A prince must avoid being contemned and hated
70(9)
20 Whether the erection of fortresses, and many other things which princes often do, are useful or injurious
79(5)
21 How princes should conduct themselves to acquire a reputation
84(4)
22 Of the ministers of princes
88(2)
23 How to avoid flatterers
90(2)
24 The reason why the princes of Italy have lost their states
92(2)
25 Of the influence of fortune in human affairs, and how it may be counteracted
94(4)
26 Exhortation to deliver Italy from foreign barbarians
98(5)
APPENDICES 103
A The history of Florence 103(10)
B(i) Public affairs are easily managed in a city where the body of the people is not corrupt; and where equality exists, there no principality can be established; nor can a republic be established where there is no equality 113(5)
B(ii) What nations the Romans had to contend against, and with what obstinacy they defended their liberty 118(5)
B(iii) To found a new republic, or to reform entirely the old institutions of an existing one, must be the work of one man only 123(3)
C To Francesco Vettori, his benefactor 126(4)
D The art of war 130(6)
E History of Florence 136(4)
F Of how many kinds are republics and of what sort was the Roman republic 140