Reviews for Princess and the Peas and Carrots


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2013 Spring
Princess-wannabe Rosebud is so particular--about clothes, about food--that she throws a royal tantrum. Later her father tells her the story of the Princess and the Pea; it's unclear what it's meant to elucidate (is the marble he finds under Rosebud's bed the reason she's so ornery?). Unlike Rosebud's dinner, the text and airy illustrations go down easy.

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Kirkus Reviews 2012 May #2
The princess and the pea, courtesy of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Hans Christian Andersen's tale of the princess and the pea is about exquisite sensitivities--of the upper crust in the original, here mainlined into the hoi polloi as what looks rather plainly to be obsessive compulsion. Perhaps the reason behind the relocation was for identification purposes, but Princess Rosebud, aka Princess Fussy in this nattering story, isn't anyone upon whom readers will want to pin their prospects. This princess likes things just so: Her crayons on the table must be like this, the sand in her bathing suit (none, that is) like that, the stretch of her socks comme ša, labels removed from all shirts and, forefend, no peas touching the carrots on her dinner plate. When the last shatters her world, she shoves the plate off the table, gets sent to her room and later apologizes. After her father reads her the original story (tipped in as separate folio leaves on successive spreads), she has a bad night's sleep thanks to a wayward marble and is confirmed a princess. As it were. Foster's eye-easy artwork, with its soft colors and comfortable, retro lines, can't elevate Princess Rosebud to enchanted status. Too finicky by half to have its day in court. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2012 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Kirkus Reviews 2012 September #2
"The Princess and the Pea," courtesy of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Hans Christian Andersen's tale of the princess and the pea is about exquisite sensitivities--of the upper crust in the original, here mainlined into the hoi polloi as what looks rather plainly to be obsessive compulsion. Perhaps the reason behind the relocation was for identification purposes, but Princess Rosebud, aka Princess Fussy in this nattering story, isn't anyone upon whom readers will want to pin their prospects. This princess likes things just so: Her crayons on the table must be like this, the sand in her bathing suit (none, that is) like that, the stretch of her socks comme ša, labels removed from all shirts and, forefend, no peas touching the carrots on her dinner plate. When the last shatters her world, she shoves the plate off the table, gets sent to her room and later apologizes. After her father reads her the original story (tipped in as separate folio leaves on successive spreads), she has a bad night's sleep thanks to a wayward marble and is confirmed a princess. As it were. Foster's eye-easy artwork, with its soft colors and comfortable, retro lines, can't elevate Princess Rosebud to enchanted status. Too finicky by half to have its day in court. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2012 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2013 January

PreS-Gr 2--Rosebud is a bit of a perfectionist. Her stuffed animals must be arranged just so, her crayons lined up in a row, and she always has a clean piece of paper waiting in case she makes a mistake. She is so exacting that she earns the nickname Princess Fussy by her family. After a particularly bad tantrum over her peas and carrots touching on her plate, her dad reads the story "Princess and the Pea" to soothe her to sleep. When she cannot get to sleep, he discovers a marble underneath her mattress, leading them to believe that she might be a genuine princess after all. Ziefert's text is fun and upbeat. Foster's cartoon illustrations add emphasis to the text and are full of vibrant watercolor touches. Readers also get a bonus: when Rosebud's dad reads her the story, it is presented in book format to flip through. This title will appeal to youngsters, especially those who are quite particular about their likes and dislikes.--Mary Cass Mabbot, Indianapolis Public Library

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