Reviews for Life


AudioFile Reviews 2010 December
One of the most highly anticipated autobiographies in years, Keith Richards's memoir, predictably, pulls no punches as the Rolling Stones' lead guitarist ruminates about his London working-class background and how he and his cronies' love of the blues propelled them to heretofore unseen heights of fame and success. Describing Richards's legendary drug consumption as well as his relationships with luminaries like John Lennon, Johnny Depp as narrator (hand-picked by Richards) is perfect, especially considering the actor previously portrayed gonzo journalist Dr. Hunter S. Thompson, whose drug indulgences and counterculture cachet equaled Richards's. Musician Joe Hurley, who shares in the reading, seems to be equally adept at channeling Richards. Richards's trademark Cockney rasp is laced with the wry bemusement of someone who's lived a charmed life. Dickensian street urchin meets A CLOCKWORK ORANGE--it's a great combo to tell the story of rock's ultimate outlaw. J.S.H. (c) AudioFile 2010, Portland, Maine

----------------------
Library Journal Reviews 2011 March #2

This memoir by Rolling Stones guitarist/songwriter/cofounder Richards is one of the most entertaining rock autobiographies in recent years. A candid and foul-mouthed "Keef" reveals how he fell in love with Chicago blues music, shares intimate details of 50 years in "the world's greatest rock'n'roll band," and reflects on his infamously contentious relationships with Mick Jagger and the late Brian Jones, giving fans long-awaited insights into both his volatile band and his personal life. Musician Joe Hurley and actor Johnny Depp share narration duties, each convincingly producing a range of voices and channeling Richards's cool and cocky charm. Richards himself opens and closes the story. Highly recommended for adult listeners interested in Richards's experiences with fame and fortune and in the Stones' genesis, early years, inner workings, and creative growth. [Includes a bonus PDF of photos; the No. 1 LJ and New York Times best-selling Little, Brown hc also received a starred review, LJ Xpress Reviews, 12/17/10.--Ed.]--Douglas King, Univ. of South Carolina Lib., Columbia

[Page 92]. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

----------------------
Library Journal BookSmack
Keef claims that if he wasn't a rocker, he'd be a librarian. Wonder as we may about his commitment to bibliographic integrity, as a diarist, he does have a great memory. His memoir proves what we already knew: he's old, ugly, and blessed with an immune system impervious to drug abuse. Listeners learn that the engine of the Rolling Stones* is (for a bazillionaire) pretty elemental. An only child who grew up in post-WWII London, he was a dorky yob guitarist who loved Chicago blues and Chuck Berry (for Richards, the sound of rock 'n' roll has "nothing to do with rock. It's to do with roll"). After he became an insanely popular dorky yob guitarist, the fun and misery started, and there's plenty of dish about it all. He loves drugs, he's still sweet on Anita Pallenberg (ewww), and though he recognizes the charm and talent of little Micky Jagger, he comes in for his fair share of insults, as does anyone else who has ever pissed Richards off. The three narrators, like the Three Tenors, play Richards effectively, not overselling what is already fully cooked. *Ronnie Wood is the carburetor; Mick Jagger is the headlight; Charlie Watts just played drums. - "Books for Dudes," Booksmack! 4/7/11 (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

----------------------
Library Journal Reviews 2014 August #1

With sometimes startling honesty, Rolling Stones guitarist Richards reflects on his life, with particular attention to his love of music. The audio version is read by Johnny Depp and musician Joe Hurley, with an introduction by Richards himself. Includes a bonus PDF with photographs.

[Page 42]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

----------------------
Publishers Weekly Reviews 2010 December #3

Johnny Depp and Joe Hurley capture Richards's rock 'n' roll spirit in a wise, charming, and textured narration of the famed guitarist's memoir. Tracing Richards's trajectory from boyhood in England through the formation of the Stones to the band's rise to world domination, this audiobook is chock-full of frank revelations and enlightening stories behind the music. The three readers do superb turns--but the seemingly arbitrary switches between them can be jarring and confusing. Depp's narration is steady, well-paced, clear, and grounded. He produces a delicious range of voices for dialogue (most notably a drunk judge in Arkansas), and Richards himself sounds a bit like an elderly, bluesy Jack Sparrow. Hurley captures the voice of Richards throughout, narrating in a gritty, growl that is spot-on. And sections read by Richards are a real treat; his raspy voice is unmistakable and haunting. A Little, Brown hardcover. (Oct.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2010 PWxyz LLC

----------------------