Reviews for Zoo


AudioFile Reviews 2012 November
The unlikely premise of PattersonÕs book is that people produce scents from their glands that cause animals to swarm and attack humans. The new pheromone, the result of electromagnetic radiation that ÒcooksÓ environmental carbons, is caused by the overuse of cell phones and electricity. Jay SnyderÕs competent reading style canÕt save this unbelievable, tedious story, which meanders without continuity or sense. Snyder does capture the fearful events of humans under attack by snapping crocodiles, gorillas, chimps, and horrible ants, yet his delivery canÕt compensate for a disjointed narrative that doesnÕt make sense. G.D.W. © AudioFile 2012, Portland, Maine

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Library Journal Reviews 2013 May #2

Patterson and Ledwidge (Now You See Her) team up again for another fast-paced thriller. This time, however, instead of the usual man vs. man conflicts, the authors pit man against nature. Animals all over the globe have begun to behave strangely, apparently coordinating attacks against humans, but when biologist Jackson Oz tries to explain this to the world, he is considered a crackpot. Only when the animal attacks become more frequent and the daughter of the U.S. president is killed does the government call in Oz to figure out why. Jay Snyder narrates, conveying the intelligence and self-deprecating humor typical of a Patterson protagonist, as well as the suspense and quick pace necessary to move the action along. VERDICT Though a bit of a departure for Patterson, this work has enough of his usual storytelling elements to keep fans satisfied. Michael Crichton buffs also may enjoy.--Theresa Horn, St. Joseph Cty. P.L., South Bend, IN

[Page 43]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2012 December #4

Lions, and tigers, and bears! Oh my! In this thriller from Patterson and Ledwidge, all members of the animal kingdom, from true predators to man's former best friends, decide that humans are what's for dinner. The book's follows narrator, Jackson Oz, an environmental biologist who has lost his reputation, his university position, and nearly all of his money trying to warn the world about just such a cataclysmic disaster. Reader Jay Snyder provides Oz with a touch of breezy optimism--at least early on--that takes the edge off the grim slashing and that occurs in the alternating third-person descriptions of man-beast encounters. Snyder also delivers a fair amount of suspense, as Oz embarks on a desperate search for the cause of and the antidote to the sudden worldwide wilding. And while the book's conclusion may strain credulity, Snyder's Oz presents his case so positively and persuasively that it's not until the final disc plays--when all the dogs and cats and rats have returned to their natural states--that anyone is likely to care. A Little, Brown hardcover. (Sept.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

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