Reviews for Happy Easter!


Kirkus Reviews 2012 April #2
Baby animals, decorated eggs and deliveries of sweet treats from the Easter Bunny are the focus of this introduction to Easter for preschoolers. The holiday is treated as a secular one in this bright and cheery offering first published in Belgium and the Netherlands. An oversized format features a single chick hatching on the cover in a strikingly simple design with internal illustrations in deep, saturated hues suggestive of Easter-egg dyes. The text uses just a few sentences set against richly colored backgrounds facing full-page illustrations on the opposite pages. Slegers provides illustrations with a jaunty, childlike simplicity that features a flattened perspective and thick, black outlines around simple shapes, such as the Easter Bunny waving from the window of his house. The simple story begins with two children decorating eggs and moves on to the Easter Bunny's methods for acquiring and delivering eggs for the forthcoming celebration. The little boy and girl featured in the book search for their eggs and dress up in new clothes on Easter, but there is no mention of any religious connection to the holiday. A buoyant, simple orientation to the Easter Bunny for little ones who are awaiting their baskets of springtime treats. (Picture book. 2-5) Copyright Kirkus 2012 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2013 February

PreS-Gr 1--In the springtime, the sun shines, flowers bloom, baby animals are born, and the Easter Bunny prepares for the approaching celebration. "But, who exactly is the Easter Bunny?" He lives in a little house in the woods, where he gathers eggs to decorate from the chickens, who are happy to help. On Easter, he fills his basket with "painted eggs, eggs with ribbons, and lots of chocolate eggs." Early in the morning, he hides them for the children to find when they wake up. Once his job is done, he hops back home ready for a long sleep. Told in straightforward, easy-to-read language, this story highlights some popular Easter traditions like making crafts, dressing up, and hunting for eggs. The illustrations, drawn with childlike simplicity and featuring thick black outlines and cheerful primary colors, echo the optimistic tone of the story. Children will appreciate this unadorned salute to the new beginnings of spring and the fabled bearer of Easter treats. However, Charlotte Zolotow's classic The Bunny Who Found Easter (Houghton Mifflin, 1998) presents a more compelling portrait of the Easter Bunny.--Linda L. Walkins, Saint Joseph Preparatory High School, Boston, MA

[Page 86]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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