Reviews for Indivisible : Poems for Social Justice


Booklist Reviews 2013 April #2
In their introduction to this unique, timely collection, the coeditors write, "These poems have been selected and arranged and offered to the reader as our contributions to living in a more socially just America." To that end, they have selected 54 previously published works by twentieth-century poets. The work represents a broad variety of races, cultures, and ethnicities and deals with such issues as bigotry and injustice, as well as with freedom, equality, and comity. Divided into five sections, the poems essentially chart a course from outside our culture to an inside where we can celebrate common dreams. The contributors range from the celebrated--Billy Collins, Ishmael Reed, Pat Mora, William Stafford--to the lesser known, and brief biographies of all are included in an appendix. Matthew Thomas Bush's elegantly decorative line drawings illustrate the pages without overwhelming the selections, and a foreword from rap artist Common will help draw more attention to this thought-provoking anthology for classroom sharing, broad discussion, and individual appreciation. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

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Booklist Reviews 2013 May #1
In their introduction to this unique, timely collection, the coeditors write, "These poems have been selected and arranged and offered to the reader as our contributions to living in a more socially just America." To that end, they have selected 54 previously published works by twentieth-century poets. The work represents a broad variety of races, cultures, and ethnicities and deals with such issues as bigotry and injustice, as well as with freedom, equality, and comity. Divided into five sections, the poems essentially chart a course from outside our culture to an inside where we can celebrate common dreams. The contributors range from the celebrated--Billy Collins, Ishmael Reed, Pat Mora, William Stafford--to the lesser known, and brief biographies of all are included in an appendix. Matthew Thomas Bush's elegantly decorative line drawings illustrate the pages without overwhelming the selections, and a foreword from rap artist Common will help draw more attention to this thought-provoking anthology for classroom sharing, broad discussion, and individual appreciation. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

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Library Media Connection Reviews 2014 January/February
The introduction to this anthology says it the best: "These poems have been selected and arranged and offered to the reader as our contributions to living in a more socially just America." These poems are a living, breathing example of thoughts and feelings across the years. The poems were selected purposefully and represent all walks of life. The thoughts and feelings of these poets should be read and discussed. The words and their passion should have us all think and feel about how we treat and how we are treated. This anthology would be an excellent addition to any library and an excellent resource in any classroom. Karen Scott, Librarian, Thompson Middle School, Alabaster, Alamaba. RECOMMENDED Copyright 2012 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2013 April

Gr 7 Up--A quote from Lincoln expressing faith in "the ultimate justice of the people" ushers in this collection of poems, while another from Whitman as to our "common indivisible destiny" marks its end. These are poems for, not just about, social justice, selected and arranged to inspire readers to action. In keeping with this bold mission, the selections are divided into five sections, intentionally orchestrated to help young people look at the American experience from different angles. In the first section, "liberty was misquoted," the poems call into question our oft-insular mindset and misguided interpretations of "other." By collection's end, however, the poems focus on "the next thing to happen," a space where teens may be moved to ponder what kinds of roles they will be bold enough to take up in this world. Yet whether readers take the intended journey or simply dip in and out, selecting a poem here or there, the impact is the same. Each poem (selections from both lesser- and well-known American poets are included) can stand strongly on its own. From Langston Hughes and Amiri Baraka to Joy Harjo and Toi Derricotte, the poets discuss perspective, misguided pity, stereotyping, patriarchy, and thousands of other sticky issues. This carefully selected collection is not only poetically breathtaking, but will undoubtedly prove useful time and again as we seek to provide resources for educating empathetic global citizens.--Jill Heritage Maza, Montclair Kimberley Academy, Montclair, NJ

[Page 177]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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VOYA Reviews 2013 August
This anthology of 20th-century American poems invites us to confront and challenge beliefs. No topic is off limits, from patriarchy to racism and classism. Even if a reader does not think she is prejudiced against someone or something, these poems will expose bias, and are presented in such a way that can help the reader find the words to confront these often difficult issues. Sarcasm, humor, and transparency are a few of the many devices used to shed light in some of these dark places. Hip-hop artist and poet, COMMON, delivers the forward which states that the poems will teach us to help understand these issues better. In the poem "Columbus Day," author Durham starts off by writing, "In school I was taught the names/Columbus, Cortez, and Pizarro and/A dozen other filthy murderers. . ." He goes on to say, "No one mentioned the names/Of even a few of the victims." In Mishkin's "Other People's Lives," she writes simply, "You have to see/Other people's lives/Before you recognize/Your own." The poems are short but packed with meaning. They can act as springboards for discussions in the classroom or library. Many of the authors will be recognizable to young readers and for those which are not, a biographical notes section is included at the end which gives background information on each contributor. Most teens care deeply about social justice issues. This short anthology can help them find their way.--Kelly Czarnecki 5Q 4P J Copyright 2011 Voya Reviews.

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