Reviews for Tuesdays at the Castle


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2012 Spring
Castle Glower makes its preferences known through rooms that appear or change on Tuesdays. The trustworthy building doesn't welcome Prince Khelsh, who arrives after the king and queen have disappeared, so royal siblings Celia and Rolf know they must stop his efforts to rule. A strong sibling alliance adds weight to a light tale in which "crumbs and bits of coarse sugar sprinkles" constitute ammunition.

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Kirkus Reviews 2011 June #1

This enjoyable romp turns mischief into political action and a stone palace into a cunning character.

Castle Glower always chooses its own king, and its current is Celie's father. Celie's family knows the castle's rules—for example, no matter where you are, "if you turned left three times and climbed through the next window, you'd end up in the kitchens"—so they navigate fine, even when Castle Glower gets bored of a Tuesday and grows a new room or hallway. When disaster strikes, the castle's protective love becomes paramount. Celie's parents and eldest brother Bran are reported killed in an ambush, leaving three siblings at home to fend off a foreign prince who's trying to assassinate Celie's brother Rolf and steal the crown. Pranks such as spreading manure on the soles of shoes and snipping threads so the baddies' clothes fall off make the siblings (and readers) giggle, but underneath the capers lies a bit of deftly written grief and fear. Luckily there are comforting clues: If King Glower were really dead, wouldn't this sentient, active castle have adapted heir Rolf's bedroom into a king's room? Instead, the foreign prince's rooms become ever smaller and bleaker, proving the castle's disapproval; but Celie and sibs still need to win the day. Never fear: These kids are clever, as is George's lively adventure.

May pique castle envy. (Fantasy. 8-11)

Copyright Kirkus 2011 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Kirkus Reviews 2011 September #2

This enjoyable romp turns mischief into political action and a stone palace into a cunning character.

Castle Glower always chooses its own king, and its current is Celie's father. Celie's family knows the castle's rules—for example, no matter where you are, "if you turned left three times and climbed through the next window, you'd end up in the kitchens"—so they navigate fine, even when Castle Glower gets bored of a Tuesday and grows a new room or hallway. When disaster strikes, the castle's protective love becomes paramount. Celie's parents and eldest brother Bran are reported killed in an ambush, leaving three siblings at home to fend off a foreign prince who's trying to assassinate Celie's brother Rolf and steal the crown. Pranks such as spreading manure on the soles of shoes and snipping threads so the baddies' clothes fall off make the siblings (and readers) giggle, but underneath the capers lies a bit of deftly written grief and fear. Luckily there are comforting clues: If King Glower were really dead, wouldn't this sentient, active castle have adapted heir Rolf's bedroom into a king's room? Instead, the foreign prince's rooms become ever smaller and bleaker, proving the castle's disapproval; but Celie and sibs still need to win the day. Never fear: These kids are clever, as is George's lively adventure.

May pique castle envy. (Fantasy. 8-11)

Copyright Kirkus 2011 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Library Media Connection Reviews 2012 January/February
The setting of this middle-grade adventure is as central a character as its spunky 11-year-old heroine, Celie. The youngest of four siblings, Celie is a princess with terrific flair for adventure and off-the-cuff leadership, traits recognized by her home, the magical Castle Glower. The castle is a living entity, with a habit of adding, remodeling, and deleting rooms on a whim. Revered through the countryside, the castle chooses people to pamper, and it is especially fond of Princess Celie. When the king and queen fall victim to an assassination plot, the castle helps Celie and her siblings hatch a plan to take back the crown. In the end, Celie's sharp thinking and her love for her home keep the castle intact. It repays her by destroying her enemies and saving her life. This story puts an unexpected spin on the typical princess tale. Readers will root equally for crafty Celie and for her castle, a truly unique and memorable "pet." Jenny MacKay, Children's Author, Sparks, Nevada. RECOM ENDED ¬ 2011 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2011 November

Gr 4-8--Princess Celie has been trying to map out the rooms in her beloved Castle Glower. The difficulty is that it whimsically manufactures, alters, and moves its rooms around whenever it deems necessary. It has chosen the kings of Sleyne, including Celie's father, King Glower the 79th, and his heir, Celie's brother Rolf. Everyone finds the meddling castle delightful and proper until the king and queen are ambushed and presumed dead. Now it seems that the Royal Council has treason in mind as it threatens Rolf, Celie, and their sister, Lilah. Celie relies on Castle Glower's affectionate interference to help them quash the cabal and reinstate the rightful rulers. Castle Glower is the true star of this charming story of court intrigue and magic. A satisfying mix of Hogwarts and Howl's Moving Castle (Greenwillow, 1986), Castle Glower helps its true citizens, but never at the expense of plot or character development. Celie and her siblings have to display courage in order to deserve its help. Celie's escapades keep the action moving briskly. Adventure stories fans will enjoy this as much as children who wear their wizard cloaks proudly. It is a good for those not quite ready for Gail Carson Levine's Ella Enchanted (HarperCollins, 1997) or Shannon Hale's Princess Academy (Bloomsbury, 2005). Most libraries will want to add Tuesdays to their fantasy collections. While the story stands alone, it is the first in a new series.--Caitlin Augusta, Stratford Library Association, CT

[Page 120]. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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