Reviews for Goodnight, Me


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
From his feet up to his eyes, a playful baby orangutan encourages each part of his body to prepare for a good night's sleep: "Legs, get some rest...Enough wriggling, bottom." The gentle text, combined with the full-page pencil, acrylic, and watercolor illustrations of predominantly purples and blues, makes this book a suitable bedtime read for rambunctious toddlers. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2007 October #2
Lying in bed, trying to fall asleep, little orangutan addresses each part of his body with a goodnight appeal. He thanks feet for running, and knees for holding legs together. He tells legs and tummy to rest and asks neck to "lay my head on that pillow." When each body part from bottom to nose, ears, mouth and eyes has been acknowledged, mother orangutan's soft kiss on the forehead finally brings on the long-awaited feeling of contentment to one drowsy little guy. Quay's soft nighttime purple/blue backgrounds offset an orange-furred, droopy-eyed baby orangutan trying out a variety of bed positions in this novel approach to a familiar toddler bedtime ritual. A comforting, self-soothing pattern for little ones to quiet their tired bodies and souls. (Picture book. 2-4) Copyright Kirkus 2007 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2007 December

PreS-- This delightful book has a quiet cadence similar to Margaret Wise Brown's Goodnight Moon (HarperCollins, 1947) as a child winds down from a busy day. After being tucked in by a loving parent, a young orangutan lies in bed and bids a loving goodnight to each body part: "Goodnight, feet. Thanks for running me around today" and "Legs, get some rest. We've got a lot of jumping to do tomorrow." After a kiss on the forehead from the parent, the youngster heads off to sleep: "Goodnight, me. See you in the morning." Using a mix of pencil, acrylic paints, and watercolors, Quay has created uncluttered spreads that focus on the highlighted body parts. The colors are as soothing as the gentle text: soft purple backgrounds, muted white bedding, and a warm shade of orange for the orangutan. The protagonist's face is expressive and childlike. Sure to ease tired readers toward sleep, this offering is perfect for bedtime or pajama storytimes.--Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH

[Page 87]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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