Reviews for Shades of Earth


Booklist Reviews 2012 December #1
The sf trilogy begun with Across the Universe (2011) and A Million Suns (2012) comes to a fittingly explosive conclusion in this satisfying series ender. From the first page, Revis fulfills the promise of the first volume: 1,456 passengers of the spaceship Godspeed finally land on Centauri-Earth, the military personnel are unfrozen from suspended animation, and everyone gets an up-close look at their brave new world. And it's not good. Right away, Revis' trademark claustrophobic suspense gives way to creature-feature thrills as pterodactyl-like monsters assault the pioneers. Amid the growing body count, the terror of the ship-born people, and the threat of unseen aliens, young lovers Amy and Elder have only each other to cling to--but that's before the introduction of Amy's new blue-eyed bodyguard. Plot holes pop up occasionally, and explanations are sometimes glossed over, but that doesn't take away from Revis' gifts as a propulsive storyteller with a knack for jarring surprises and raising the stakes. Pair with Dom Testa's Galahad series for a one-two punch of impressive modern YA sci-fi. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Revis' trilogy has rightfully lit up best-seller lists, and a major promotional campaign, including two Comic-Cons, should keep attention amped. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2013 Fall
This trilogy-ender picks up with Earth-born Amy and ship-born leader Elder poised to leave Godspeed and make planetfall on Centauri-Earth. Throughout the series, Revis has brought real and immediate emotions to sci-fi scenarios and here she invests that skill in making readers feel the awe and wonder facing humanity as the characters step out onto an alien planet for the first time.

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2013 #1
This third book in the trilogy picks up right where A Million Suns (rev. 3/12) left off, with Earth-born Amy and ship-born leader Elder poised to leave Godspeed and make planetfall on Centauri-Earth. A rough landing on the new planet and attacks by pterodactyl-like creatures lead to worsening tensions between Elder and the recently awakened "frozens," Amy's parents among them. Amy's father assumes control of the colony, but the secrets he's keeping in his role of good soldier for the FRX, the military-industrial corporation that first launched Godspeed all those centuries ago, places strains on Amy's trust. Even more confusingly, analysis of a ptero corpse reveals both Sol-Earth genetic material and Phydus, the drug used on Godspeed to control the population. Amy and Elder attempt to unravel the mystery while a shadowy alien menace tracks the colony -- but could FRX be the greater threat? Plausible technological advances make for surprising yet satisfying plot twists and revelations as the book builds tension. Throughout the series, Revis has brought real and immediate emotions to sci-fi scenarios -- being frozen in cryo-sleep, living aboard a claustrophobic "generation ship" -- and here she invests that skill in making readers feel, along with her protagonists, the awe and wonder facing humanity as the characters step out onto an alien planet for the first time. anita l. burkam

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Kirkus Reviews 2012 December #1
Though not "frexing brilly" like Across the Universe (2011) and A Million Suns (2012), this conclusion nonetheless supplies plenty of suspense and twists to satisfy readers already on the ride. Desperate to live on a planet, even one with unidentified monsters, Elder and Amy gather 1,456 terrified people onto a shuttle and break away from their life-supporting spaceship to land on Centauri-Earth, a planet with two suns. There's no turning back: shuttle operation is dubious, and only the prematurely awakened Amy's ever lived on a planet--Elder's people were born on Godspeed, a generation ship. Also aboard the shuttle are "frozens," earthborn scientists and military personnel--including Amy's parents--who've been cryogenically frozen for five centuries, waiting for arrival. On Centauri-Earth, pterodactyllike creatures, toxic flora, sentient beings who won't reveal themselves, and hostility between earthborns and shipborns ("They're not our people") all bring danger. Death tolls soar as Elder and Amy--alternating first-person narration in virtually indistinguishable voices--race to unravel history and mysteries. Romantic focus and purple prose exceed that found in the previous volumes ("I die at the end of each kiss and am brought gasping back to life at the beginning of the next"), which is a pity. Interpersonal relationships and motivations aren't Revis' strong point, but action and revelations are. Strong on setup and plot, weak on human complexities and characterization, this still brings it home on a planet far from home. (Science fiction. 14 & up) Copyright Kirkus 2012 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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