Reviews for Saving the World and Other Extreme Sports : A Maximum Ride Novel


AudioFile Reviews 2007 October/November
There's nothing simple about SIMPLE GENIUS, a complicated novel involving murder, geniuses, and the CIA. The story marks the return of former Secret Service Agents Sean King and Michelle Maxwell, now in business for themselves. Scott Brick captures the excitement of this thriller with his unique pacing and style, which are perfect here. Brick even manages to sound somewhat feminine when he needs to be, and his voice for the Southern black gentleman is classic. The beginning of the novel is a story within a story, as Maxwell ends up institutionalized after inexplicably attacking a man in a sleazy bar. Everything comes together in a mysterious settlement for geniuses, where people are being murdered. There's a lot of heart in this work. M.S. (c) AudioFile 2007, Portland, Maine

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Booklist Reviews 2010 April #2
The Maximum Ride series' flock of winged children is off to Africa for a photo op while providing humanitarian aid. Then Max's rival, Angel, prophesies that best-friend Fang will be the first to die and it will happen soon. When Dr. Gunther-Hagen introduces Max to Dylan, a gorgeous new bird kid who has been designed to be Max's perfect mate, Max's voices tell her Dylan is perfect for her. But how does this affect her commitment to Fang? This will excite the legions of fans waiting for this installment in the flock's story. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.

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Booklist Reviews 2007 August #1
The end is near . . . or is it? So reads the tagline of Book 3 of the Maximum Ride series, suggesting that Patterson's best-selling series for YAs may expand beyond the trilogy originally planned--news that will be greeted enthusiastically by fans of its 14-year-old heroine. Slated for extermination by their scientist creators, rebel-mutant Max and other members of her flock, all of whom possess bird DNA and functioning wings, are on the lam again, their mission to save the world from a eugenics plot. Affection for the dauntless characters and misadventures that build on universal yearnings about sprouting wings and taking flight will hold readers. Copyright 2007 Booklist Reviews.

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Booklist Reviews 2005 February #1
Gr. 7---9. Patterson, best known for his dark, gritty thrillers featuring psychologist Alex Cross, first dipped his toes in the waters of children's literature with SantaKid (2004). Aiming at an older youth readership this time and reworking ideas and characters that appeared first in his adult novels When the Wind Blows (1998) and The Lake House (2003), he delivers an action-packed cross between Gertrude Chandler Warner's Boxcar Children and Marvel Comics' X-Men. Fourteen-year-old Max (short for Maximum Ride) leads an usual group of children, escapees from an institution that designed them by "grafting avian DNA onto human genes." Yup, these kids have wings. When Angel, the smallest of the group, is kidnapped by mutants and taken back to the "school," Max and her family determine to get her back--no matter what. Patterson occasionally forgets his audience here, as evidenced by his sardonic tone and such glib adult asides as "they found their prey: moi," but he's picked a comfortable formula (orphans protecting one another and making a home together), which he's cushioned with an abundance of slavering beasts, childhood heartaches, and unresolved issues--all in preparation for the sequel in 2006, in which Max will, presumably, assume the role she's been assigned here: savior of the world. Expect the Patterson name to attract a crossover audience of both adults and youth. ((Reviewed February 1, 2005)) Copyright 2005 Booklist Reviews.

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Booklist Reviews 2006 May #2
Gr. 7-10. Max and her flock are back in this new volume in the Maximum Ride series, a follow-up to The Angel Experiment (2004). In a flying fight with Erasers, Fang is injured so seriously that the flock takes him to a hospital. It's obvious he's not a normal human (having wings and avian DNA), so it isn't long before the FBI shows up. Anne Walker, the lead agent, takes the flock home to her Virginia farm, where she tries to mother the kids and enrolls them in a nearby private school. Living a somewhat normal life for the first time, Max, 14, manages a date and a first kiss, and others in the flock begin the quest to find their birth parents. Then everything falls apart, and the six kids face betrayal and extreme danger. Patterson, an accomplished storyteller, once again demonstrates his ability to write page-turning action scenes, this time leavening the suspense with some surprising humor; at one point, Max declares that she's "Avian American." Fans of the first book will be delighted with this continuation of the story, even though the book leaves the fate of the flock wide open^B. For more about Patterson's jump into YA, see the adjacent Story behind the Story. ((Reviewed May 15, 2006)) Copyright 2006 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2010 Fall
In their latest adventure, the flock of genetically modified bird kids start to resent the relationship between their leader, Max and the newest flock-member, Fang. Meanwhile, an evil scientist wants to speed up humanity's genetic evolution. Built around increasingly generic characters and awkward introspective narration, this haphazard series' latest installment is the weakest yet. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
Max, still on the run, uncovers the corporate enemy's endgame: save the world by halving its population--unless she and her fellow genetic hybrid "bird kids" can stop it. Though the blog-recruited army-o'-kids is hard to swallow, Patterson impressively manages to challenge the flock in new ways (disunity! romance!) while offering satisfying, occasionally surprising answers to the series's overriding questions. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2006 Spring
Max Ride and five other human-avian genetic hybrids fly (literally) from the lab where they were created as experiments and forge a new life in hiding. When six-year-old Angel is captured, Max leads her makeshift family in a rescue attempt, raising questions about their origins and destiny. Smart-mouthed, sympathetic characters and copious butt-kicking make this fast read pure escapist pleasure. Copyright 2006 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2006 Fall
Slightly choppier than the first book, this installment finds Max and her motley flock of human-bird genetic hybrids seeking temporary refuge in the home of an FBI agent. Forced into a formal education, they research their past amid double-identity mayhem. Despite an episodic plot line, fans will be thrilled with the ongoing character growth and well-timed revelations. Copyright 2006 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2007 May #1
Patterson wraps up his sci-fi thriller series with consistent excitement but too few explanations. Max and her flock, human with avian genes, flee the mad scientists and seek answers. Fang starts a blog, hoping that kids around the world can help. The flock is captured again and escapes again, aided by Ari, the seven-year-old human morphed halfway into a wolf; but fears about Ari's loyalties split up the flock for the first time. The final battle takes place in Germany, where Max learns who runs the international corporation planning to reduce the earth's population through a massive genocide. The short, action-packed chapters end breathlessly, with twists at every turn; however, too many unanswered questions have been raised throughout the trilogy. Patterson clears up some mysteries--including Max's unknown parentage--but much of the drama seems manufactured expressly for page-turner effect, while the promised emotional and technological complexities fall by the wayside. Adrenaline galore, but seriously compromised by the unsatisfying wrap-up. (Science fiction. YA) Copyright Kirkus 2007 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

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Kirkus Reviews 2006 April #1
Readers are in for another exciting wild ride of fights (bloody) and flights (in the sky) as Max and her flock struggle to stay alive. 98% human with 2% avian genes grafted on, these six winged, scrappy kids soar powerfully through the air. In this second installment, they head towards Washington D.C. in pursuit of their unknown parents of origin, who may or may not know that the kids were raised by genetic scientists prone to torture. Max's straightforward, sardonic first-person voice does most of the narration as the flock navigates a rescue by a vaguely maternal FBI honcho, a stint in a regular school (or is it?) and constant pursuit by Erasers (deadly wolf-human combinations). Who controls the Voice in Max's head telling her to save the world? What would that even mean? Is an international corporation the enemy? Who's in league with the evil scientists who created the flock? These questions are yet unanswered, leaving readers breathless for the follow-up to this action-packed page-turner. (Science fiction. YA)$1,000,000 ad/promo Copyright Kirkus 2006 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

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Kirkus Reviews 2005 April #1
Nonstop action carries this page-turner breathlessly from start to finish. Fourteen-year-old Max (full name Maximum Ride) and her "flock" have escaped from a horrific School that kept them in cages and tortured them in the name of scientific research. Max and her flock are genetic experiments: 98% human with 2% avian genes grafted on, they're super-powerful-and can fly. "Erasers" (violent genetic combinations of men and wolves) pursue them at every turn. Crossing the country first to save their youngest from the School's scientific sadists and then track down their histories (were they born from parents or test tubes?), they wind up in New York City's sewers. Max develops shattering headaches and a Voice in her head that crashes nearby computers and tells her to save the world. Is it a friend or the flock's betrayer? Short chapters and paragraphs are smoothly accessible; Max's easy-to-read voice alternates between immediate and sardonic. The ending reveals frustratingly few answers, leaving layers of mystery for the sequel. Speed, suspense, excitement. (Science fiction. YA) Copyright Kirkus 2005 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Library Journal Reviews 2009 November #2
Max and her Flock are working for a food-distribution program in Africa, where they're closely watched by the program's benefactor and receive a dire warning: "The sky will fall." With child-proofed language; note that other "Maximum Ride" titles are heading for the big screen. Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.

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Library Journal Reviews 2008 November #2
With fish dying by the millions and ships sinking by the hundreds, Maximum Ride and his buddies are called on to discover what evil lurks off Hawaii's coast. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2007 April #4
14-year-old Max (first introduced in Patterson's When the Wind Blows) leads a band of mutant orphans against evil scientists in an effort to rescue her young friend. Ages 9-12. (May) Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2006 May #3
The Angel Experiment James Patterson. Warner, $6.99 ISBN 0-446-61779-2. Thriller writer Patterson takes characters that first appeared in his adult novels When the Wind Blows and its sequel, The Lake House, and places them in a story pitched at young adults. Ages 12-up. (May) n Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2006 July #4
Max, Fang, Iggy, Gasman, Nudge and Angel are being hunted by killers. No big deal because these kids can fly, literally. But how will this new threat to their safety affect their mission to save the world? Listeners will find out in School's Out Forever, James Patterson's second installment of the Maximum Ride series narrated with aplomb by Valentina de Angelis. (June). Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 July #2
Themes from Patterson's popular adult titles When the Wind Blows and The Lake House waft through this YA thriller, the author's first in the genre. Wood stars as Maximum Ride, 14-year-old leader of a band of kids who have escaped the lab where they were bred as 98% human and 2% bird (wings being a key component) and developed a variety of other-worldly talents. In Patterson's unusual universe, Max and her young cohorts are soon forced to rescue one of their own-a girl named Angel-from a pack of mutant wolf-humans called Erasers. Wood nails Patterson's often adult-beyond-their-years dialogue with a jaded tone. But the result of this pairing makes Max sound more off-putting than cool or intriguing. The listening experience is stalled in the starting gate, keeping the action-adventure earthbound rather than high-flying. Ages 12-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 March #3
Thriller writer Patterson takes characters that first appeared in his adult novels When the Wind Blows and its sequel, The Lake House, and places them in an overblown, nearly incomprehensible story pitched at young adults. Max (aka Maximum Ride), the 14-year-old girl from both of the aforementioned novels, leads a band of mutant orphans hiding from the sinister scientists at "the School," who grafted avian DNA onto their genes, giving them wings (plot points established in When the Wind Blows). When the School's henchmen-"Erasers," "half-men, half-wolves" (one of whom is their rescuer Jeb's seven-year-old son)-kidnap six-year-old Angel, the youngest member of "the flock," Max and company will stop at nothing to rescue her. Well, nothing except to aid a stranger, bond with some real birds, eat lunch and take lengthy naps. The often violent hunt-and-chase plot resembles that of a Saturday morning superhero cartoon. The point of view shifts jerkily before settling into Max's first-person narration, which is self-deprecating but never sounds like a real teen's voice, and the novel is strewn with mutations of nouns-turned-adjectives ("tunnel-visiony," "antisepticky," even "Robin Hoodsy"). Loose ends abound but presumably the sequel, scheduled for 2006, will reveal the identity of the evil "whitecoats" and their motives as well as who owns the Voice speaking inside Max's head. The Patterson name will attract readers; but his fans may be disappointed that this tale never takes flight. Ages 12-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews
The fifth entry in Patterson's all-ages Maximum Ride fantasy/thriller series finds the teenaged title character facing her greatest challenge yet. Max, leading her flock of virtually indestructible part-human/part-bird hybrids, must rescue her human mom, kidnapped by a criminal mastermind with an elaborate plan to wreak worldwide ecological catastrophe. But in order to rescue her, 14-year-old Max and the five younger members of her flock (genetically developed by an environmental group) must team up with the U.S. Navy to determine why millions of fish are dying off the coast of Hawaii. All this, and Max is falling in love, too. Patterson doesn't spend much time on character development, opting to propel his wild story with quick action scenes, plenty of dialogue and chapters seldom longer than three or four pages; unfortunately, though, life-and-death situations are often solved by implausible plot turns. Max narrates with a precocious, snarky voice, but makes it relatively easy to jump into her complicated tale midstream. Not surprisingly, the open-ended conclusion begs for a follow-up; it's also little wonder that a movie franchise is in the works. (Apr.) Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2010 November

Gr 6-9--Patterson has created another thrilling adventure that is sure to capture readers' imaginations. Max is the leader of a group known as the Flock, and the story revolves around her struggles and emotional dilemmas. These winged mutants are set upon by an evil scientist who wants to use their special talents to suit his own ends. However, that is just one of Max's problems. After a dire prediction by Angel, she is terrified that Fang will die. He is the love of Max's life, and she can not bear the thought of losing him. The author's strong writing style will draw readers into the situations that arise as Max tries to protect the Flock from peril while attempting to avoid Fang's impending doom. The love triangle between Max, Fang, and another winged mutant is also well developed and creates tension throughout. The story line moves readers from the dry, sweltering heat of Africa to the bright lights of Hollywood as Max tries to maintain unity in the Flock and shelter them from danger. The action builds throughout, and there are enough plot twists and surprises to keep readers guessing about what will happen next as the young Flock is eventually snared in the villain's web. Patterson's quick-paced tale of adventure, betrayal, and redemption is full of vibrant and memorable characters. It truly has bite.--Greg Stone, Oak Mountain Middle School, Birmingham, AL

[Page 124]. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2010 September

Gr 6-10--On a goodwill mission in Africa, Max and the flock meet Dr. Hans Gunther-Hagen, a scientific researcher and billionaire purporting to be a philanthropist in this episode (Little Brown, 2010) in James Patterson's series. He introduces Max to Dylan, a hunky heartthrob bird-kid secretly created to woo 15-year-old Max as a future mate. Skeptical of Dylan's motives and Dr. Hackjob-Wackjob's humanitarian efforts to use adaptive genetics to improve survival among the less fortunate, Max learns toxic chemicals have been used on orphans in Chad. Angel upsets the flock with a prediction of Fang's death and, seemingly brainwashed by Dr. Hans, challenges Max as flock leader. Action passages are fewer than in previous installments as Angel goes off to help Dr. Hans, Dylan moves into the safe house, and Fang follows Max to Las Vegas to contemplate their future. In a fast-paced ending, Fang is captured and rendered lifeless and Angel telepathically calls the flock to help. Jill Apple adeptly captures Max's softer side as she anguishes about Fang and the new flock dynamic, while retaining familiar acerbic tones unleashed on Dr. Hunka-Munka. Almost all of the voices are spot-on, and it is only a minor irritation that Fang seems persistently hoarse. Subtle music and sound effects punctuate the action. Fans of the series will eagerly await the next installment.--Vicki Reutter, Cazenovia Jr./Sr. High School, NY

[Page 60]. Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2009 August

Gr 7-9--In this installment in the series, Max, the super-spunky, flying, mutant bird-girl and "kick butt warrior," and her flock battle evil, ecologically thoughtless foes. Fast-paced thrills spill from the pages and pull readers in, starting on page one when a suicide sniper cyborg/human aims his automatic pistol at Max as she flies in an air show over Los Angeles. To help publicize her mother's environmental group, Coalition to Stop the Madness, Max has agreed to lead the flying flock in these touring shows. Performing soon endangers her life, however, by bringing her identity and relationship with the CSM to the immediate attention of Mr. Chu, whose business has dumped radioactive material into the ocean around Hawaii. These toxins are killing millions of fish and causing grisly mutations to other sea creatures. Mr. Chu almost kills Max and then kidnaps her mother, holding her for ransom in a submarine. With the flock members' extraordinary abilities--Gazzy's inventiveness, Max's strength and intuitive "voice" in her head, and Angel's telepathy and her ability to speak to some helpful mutant sea creatures, Max rescues her mother. Patterson weaves humor into the dramatic action. In addition, Max's romantic relationship with Fang ripens to a more serious level than in the previous books. Hints of an approaching apocalypse, repeated references to Max's "mission in saving the world," and a few lingering questions such as her precarious relationship with her father all leave open the possibility of a sequel.--James K. Irwin, Sandy Library, UT

[Page 112]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2007 July

Gr 7 Up-- Six genetically altered bird-kids continue their mission to prevent the evil scientists who created them from making good on their diabolical plan to eradicate half of the world's population. Just as the flock lets down its guard, the wolflike Erasers resurface to capture the younger members, while Max takes Fang on a detour through Arizona to ask Dr. Martinez, a vet, to surgically remove the tracking chip in her arm. Former nemesis Ari returns, this time as a friend, but Fang's distrust splits the flock along gender lines as he, Iggy, and Gazzy hang out in Venice Beach, while Max, Ari, Nudge, and Angel fly to Europe to infiltrate Itex headquarters. Inside, Max learns vital information about her past, including who her parents are and who controls the "Voice" in her head. A caricatured evil scientist, Dr. Borcht, informs the recombinant-DNA experiments that their expiration date is up and Max is forced into a fight-to-the-death with Omega, the robot boy. Survival options run out as Fang attempts to mobilize armies of kids to attack all worldwide Itex labs by posting appeals on his fast-growing blog. Popular-culture references abound and readers will be drawn to Max's razor-sharp tongue, especially honed in this volume, making her an edgier heroine than in the last. The dialogue-driven story ends with minor casualties and hints at the possibility of further adventures.--Vicki Reutter, Cazenovia High School, NY

[Page 108]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Review 2006 August

Gr 6-10 This book picks up exactly where The Angel Experiment (Little, Brown, 2005) left off. The six genetically engineered bird children have escaped from the wolf-hybrid Erasers again, Max is still hearing The Voice in her head, and she is still reeling from the revelation that Ari, the most persistent of all the Erasers, is dead by her hand and that he might be her brother. From this point forward, there is action, but no distinctive plot. The closest the story line comes to compelling is when the kids are taken in and enrolled in school by a seemingly kind woman who just happens to be a high-ranking FBI agent. It will not shock readers when it is eventually revealed that she has betrayed them. This book is full of as many twists, turns, and conspiracies as an episode of daytime drama. And just like a soap opera, it relies heavily on melodrama until the very end, whereupon readers discover that very little has actually happened. The story is disappointingly anticlimactic and violent. Still, it does have some appealthe children continually outmaneuver their attackers without permanent damage. Plus, the talking dog they pick up during their adventures is sure to entertain.Heather M. Campbell, Philip S. Miller Library, Castle Rock, CO

[Page 127]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2005 May
Gr 7 Up-A group of genetically enhanced kids who can fly and have other unique talents are on the run from part-human, part-wolf predators called Erasers in this exciting SF thriller that's not wholly original but is still a compelling read. Max, 14, and her adopted family-Fang and Iggy, both 13, Nudge, 11, Gazzy, 8, and Angel, 6-were all created as experiments in a lab called the School. Jeb, a sympathetic scientist, helped them escape and, since then, they've been living on their own. The Erasers have orders to kill them so the world will never find out they exist. Max's old childhood friend, Ari, now an Eraser leader, tracks them down, kidnaps Angel, and transports her back to the School to live like a lab rat again. The youngsters are forced to use their special talents to rescue her as they attempt to learn about their pasts and their destinies. The novel ends with the promise that this journey will continue in the sequel. As with Patterson's adult mystery thrillers, in-depth characterization is secondary to the fast-moving plot. The narrative alternates between Max's first-person point-of-view and that of the others in the third person, but readers don't get to know Max very well. The only major flaw is that the children sound like adults most of the time. This novel is reminiscent of David Lubar's Hidden Talents (Tor, 1999) and Ann Halam's Dr. Franklin's Island (Random, 2002).-Sharon Rawlins, Piscataway Public Library, NJ Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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VOYA Reviews 2007 August
The winged mutants return for a third installment in the Maximum Ride series. The group of six human-avian hybrids, along with their talking dog, are still on the run from the evil scientists of the Itex Corporation, who created them and who now want to destroy them. When Max and her crew discover that Itex has a plan to obliterate half the world's population as well as all of the early-model mutants, they are compelled to interfere. By now, they have a small network of friends whom they can trust, and Fang makes good use of his blog to recruit the children of the world to help them with their mission. Romantic tension leads Max and Fang to take separate paths-Max with the girls, who travel Europe in search of Itex headquarters, and Fang with the boys in the United States. Some surprises occur along the way when the identity of Max's parents is revealed and when her former archenemy joins the fight against Itex This novel has more depth than the previous two books in the series. Questions of environmental damage, ethics in science, gender issues, and what it means to be human are at the center of the story. Max is very outspoken about violence and its causes, and she fights regretfully when it is necessary. The chapters are short, taut, and filled with action, keeping readers engaged. Although the conclusion feels more final than in the previous books, Patterson leaves it open for another installment.-Jenny Ingram 3Q 5P M J S Copyright 2007 Voya Reviews.

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VOYA Reviews 2006 April
This sequel picks up where last year's popular Maximum Ride: The Angel Experiment (Little, Brown, 2005/VOYA April 2005) left off, with the six angel-human hybrids in mid-flight with their dog, en route from New York to Washington, D.C., searching for information about their parents and their creation. The story alternates between the first-person narration of fourteen-year-old Max, the group's mother figure, and the third-person narration that moves the story along, mostly following the actions of the hybrids' nemeses, the Erasers, and the evil scientist who created both types of mutant. When one of the flock is seriously injured and taken to a hospital, the FBI steps in and sends the group to live under observation at the country home of a high-ranking agent. There they attend school and live quietly for a while, but they still pursue the identities of their parents in secret. When the Erasers catch up to them, Max listens to the often-present voice in her head and takes the flock to Florida, where they confront their creator and the conglomerate corporation that was behind their creation As with the first book, the action is fast paced and keeps the reader engaged. The story this time is not so sinister, in part because the graphic laboratory scenes that were so prevalent in the first book are absent. The author raises the question of family and relationships when one member of the flock is exploited by his newfound parents and quickly returns to Max's care. The ending is ambiguous and open for another installment, should Patterson choose to write one.-Jenny Ingram 3Q 5P M J Copyright 2006 Voya Reviews.

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VOYA Reviews 2005 April
When their nemeses locate them and kidnap Angel, the youngest member of their ragtag group, five young flying mutants return to the laboratory that created them to get her back. After rescuing Angel, fourteen-year-old Max, the oldest of the bunch and narrator of the story, leads the group on a journey from coast to coast to escape detection and learn more about their origins. Settling precariously in New York City, they alternate sleeping in Central Park's trees and in homeless camps in the subway tunnels while searching for the source of the voice that Max hears in her head, telling her that she must save the world. After liberating mutants from another laboratory and locating files about themselves, Max's group flies to Washington, D.C., for the next installment in this new series Patterson's book is action packed and a page-turner. Most description happens when it involves violence or gore; scenes in the laboratories involving cruel medical tests are especially graphic. The conclusion is neither as revealing nor as suspenseful as the reader could hope for, and although the characters have their own attributes, it is difficult to keep them straight. Nevertheless this book will no doubt appeal to teens because of its fast pace and because of Patterson's name recognition as the author of the Alex Cross thrillers and other adult-marketed novels.-Jenny Ingram 3Q 4P M J Copyright 2005 Voya Reviews.

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