Reviews for To Sell Is Human : The Surprising Truth About Moving Others


Choice Reviews 2013 July
"We're all in sales now," says motivational guru Pink, author of the best sellers Drive (2009) and Whole New Mind (CH, Mar'06, 43-4133). Whether selling a shiny new car or raffle tickets for a kid's school fund-raiser, or trying to get an employer to hire them, people are all "persuading, convincing, and influencing others to give up something they've got in exchange for something we've got." Pink reports that one in nine Americans works in sales these days, and then notes that the other eight do, too. This is because "salespeople" are not just in sales anymore. They are technicians, consultants, advisers, professionals, and anyone with an idea or service to offer. To succeed in this landscape where everyone is selling to everyone else, Pink advises that it is important to know the "ABCs": attunement, buoyancy, and clarity factors. Attunement involves connecting with others and showing empathy. Buoyancy is the skill to stay afloat in a sea of rejection. Clarity calls on problem-solving and communication skills. Add in Pink's advice on the art of the pitch, improvisation techniques, and building a desire to serve, and the reader is ready to join the sales ranks. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, practitioners, and general readers. Upper-division Undergraduates; Graduate Students; Researchers/Faculty; Professionals/Practitioners. P. G. Kishel Cypress College Copyright 2013 American Library Association.

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Library Journal Reviews 2013 December #1

Pink's exceptional work provides insight into how buyer and seller behavior, psychology, and culture intersect in consumer motivation. A crucial read for members of the sandwich generation wishing to become more empowered consumers and advocates.

[Page 51]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2013 February #1

Pink (A Whole New Mind) has a new message and it is one most people may not want to hear: "We're all in sales now." Like discovering your favorite professor in a box, his fast-moving screed is packed with information, reasons to care about his message, how and why to execute his suggestions, and it's all accentuated with meaningful examples. He introduces a number of key concepts, such as "social cartography" and an update of Robert Cialdini's "contrast principle", to illustrate the importance of sales. Pink then discusses "how to's" via "motivational interviewing" and doles out specific tasks, such as learning how to obtain crucial information by asking better questions. His citations of relevant research studies, quizzes, exercises, and admonitions keep readers involved, active, and ready to reach for additional resources. For those tempted to turn away, Pink's examples of companies that didn't remain current, like Encyclopedia Britannica (remember them?), are a wakeup call and really drive his point home. Even if readers only absorb Pink's section on types of sales pitches, they'll understand why this book deserves a good, long look. (Jan.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

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Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

Pink (A Whole New Mind) has a new message and it is one most people may not want to hear: "We're all in sales now." Like discovering your favorite professor in a box, his fast-moving screed is packed with information, reasons to care about his message, how and why to execute his suggestions, and it's all accentuated with meaningful examples. He introduces a number of key concepts, such as "social cartography" and an update of Robert Cialdini's "contrast principle", to illustrate the importance of sales. Pink then discusses "how to's" via "motivational interviewing" and doles out specific tasks, such as learning how to obtain crucial information by asking better questions. His citations of relevant research studies, quizzes, exercises, and admonitions keep readers involved, active, and ready to reach for additional resources. For those tempted to turn away, Pink's examples of companies that didn't remain current, like Encyclopedia Britannica (remember them?), are a wakeup call and really drive his point home. Even if readers only absorb Pink's section on types of sales pitches, they'll understand why this book deserves a good, long look. (Jan.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

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