Reviews for Me and My Dragon: Scared of Halloween


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2014 Spring
A boy and his dragon (Hameer and Sparky from Me and My Dragon) "enjoy the same stuff--except for trick-or-treating." The boy loves Halloween, but the dragon is downright terrified. Biedrzycki's text and illustrations are balanced with sneaky jokes hidden throughout. His illustrations are colorful and vibrant, and his dragon is so expressive, you can't help but laugh out loud.

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2013 #5
A boy and his dragon (Hameer and Sparky from Me and My Dragon) "enjoy the same stuff -- except for trick-or-treating." The boy loves Halloween, but the dragon is downright terrified. In an attempt to get his dragon ready for the holiday, the boy creates a number of costumes, hoping the creature can overcome his fear. But when the dragon is scared of his own zombie reflection and lights his tutu on fire, things start looking bad. Biedrzycki's text and illustrations are balanced with sneaky jokes hidden throughout. His illustrations are colorful and vibrant, and his dragon is so expressive, you can't help but laugh out loud. siân gaetano Copyright 2013 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2013 August #1
Biedrzycki returns with a follow-up story of these two friends (Me and My Dragon, 2011), with a focus on Dragon's fear of Halloween. A boy and his oversized, bright red dragon enjoy many of the same things: birthday parties, parades and fireworks. But when the end of October nears, Dragon is not enthused. "He's scared of werewolves. Zombies give him the creeps. And he hides whenever he sees a mummy." The boy tries explaining that these creatures "aren't real," but Dragon is still scared. Thus begins a quest to make Dragon a costume so he can better understand and experience "what Halloween is all about." As the boy and his dragon try out various dress-up ideas, readers will be mildly entertained by the humor infusing the digitally rendered illustrations. Dragon is first unsuccessfully wrapped in a mess of toilet paper as a mummy, then he's unable to see where he is going in his Robodragon get-up, freaks out at his reflection in the mirror as a zombie and is utterly uncomfortable in a ballerina tutu. Of course, all ends well. Children coping with their own anxieties about Halloween as well as kids stumped for a costume to choose for trick-or-treating will appreciate the determination these two characters display. Although the book has its merits, though, the language is ploddingly pedestrian and concludes predictably. Not a must-have. (Picture book. 3-6) Copyright Kirkus 2013 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2013 August

PreS-Gr 2--In Me and My Dragon (Charlesbridge, 2011), a boy discusses the ins and outs of having a dragon for a pet. In this follow-up story, the boy and his dragon are having a great time. The two have everything in common-except a love for Halloween. While the boy is excited to trick-or-treat, the fire-breathing beast is petrified of the werewolves, zombies, and mummies they will encounter. After a comical montage of dressing the dragon in a series of costumes that simply will not work, the boy gets a great idea: he can be a knight and the dragon can trick-or-treat as himself. And because no one will know he is a real dragon, he can even pick out his own candy. The charm of this book is in the details. While the text is straightforward, the facial expressions and information delivered by the rich and bold Adobe Photoshop images demand a second and third reading.--Jennifer Miskec, Longwood University, Farmville, VA

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