Reviews for Six Million Paper Clips : The Making Of A Children's Holocaust Memorial


Booklist Reviews 2005 January #1
Gr. 5-8. In rural Whitwell, Tennessee, all 1,600 residents are alike, "white, Anglo-Saxon, and Protestant." When the community middle school decided to teach diversity by focusing on the Holocaust, the students did not believe that the Nazis had killed six million Jews and five million others. To help them grasp the numbers, they collected 11 million paper clips, which they placed in a memorial made from a German World War II railcar. The paper clip image may seem trivial to some, and the authors don't deal with present-day racism and intolerance, with the exception of one student talking about being inspired to stop bullying. But the story of the memorial project, which reached out across the world, is interwoven with facts about the genocide, and the book's open design, with lots of color photos of contemporary kids and adults involved in building the memorial, will introduce the Holocaust to those who know nothing about it. This may also get students talking. ((Reviewed January 1 & 15, 2005)) Copyright 2005 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Spring
With help from around the world, middle school students from Whitwell, Tennessee, collected almost thirty million paper clips, created a Holocaust memorial, and learned how to educate others about intolerance. The book describes each step of the project (sometimes in too much detail) through narrative and captioned photographs and may inspire readers to undertake their own community projects. Ind. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2005 July
Gr 4-8-With clear and concise language, color photographs, and an attractive layout, this book tells the inspiring and touching story of the teachers, students, and community of Whitwell Middle School in Tennessee, and their quest to understand and teach about the Holocaust. The authors, White House correspondents for a group of German newspapers, helped the school publicize the project to collect six million paper clips to show just how many people were murdered and obtained a German railcar to house them. The book includes a lot of quotes and behind-the-scenes information. Footnotes help to define unfamiliar terms. While the book mentions The Diary of Anne Frank, Livia Bitton-Jackson's I Have Lived a Thousand Years: Growing Up in the Holocaust (S & S, 1997), and Hana Volavkova's I Never Saw Another Butterfly: Children's Drawings and Poems from Terezin Concentration Camp 1942-1944 (Schocken, 1993), there is no list for further reading. Regardless, Schroeder and Schroeder-Hildebrand's title will be a helpful and accessible resource for Holocaust educators and students, as well as independent readers. It is also a wonderful companion to the documentary film Paper Clips.-Rachel Kamin, Temple Israel Libraries & Media Center, West Bloomfield, MI Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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VOYA Reviews 2005 June
In a unique effort to teach diversity, the Whitwell Middle School in Whitwell, Tennessee, decided to teach the Holocaust and the roots of intolerance in the spring of 1998. What followed was a community-wide effort in this small town of 1,600 people living across the mountains from Chattanooga. Begun as an after-school project by a handful of students, it blossomed into an international communication among students from many countries, Holocaust survivors, and government officials, culminating in the arrival of an authentic transport train, which has become a children's memorial. The collection of six million paper clips connected with the World War II Norwegian nationalist effort that commemorated their own solidarity against the Nazis. The gargantuan task of counting and collecting six million haunts the text. In succinct prose, stunning photographs, and personal narratives, this book lays out the project, from the first indications that students were not familiar with the Holocaust to the proud step-by-step efforts of the students and faculty, and to the ongoing "symbolic resting place for millions of victims who had no graves." The Whitwell project has been featured on the Charles Osgood File and has been made into a documentary film, and this upper elementary to middle school volume provides another detailed view of a significant addition to Holocaust literature. The middle school Web site at http://www.marionschools.org/holocaust is referred to in the text but the URL is not provided. This omission is the only drawback to the chronicle of this outstanding achievement.-Nancy K. Wallace $7.95 Trade pb. ISBN 1-58013-176-X. Index. Photos. Appendix. 4Q 3P M J Copyright 2005 Voya Reviews.

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