Reviews for Twelve Little Cakes


Booklist Reviews 2004 September #2
In Ake: The Years of Childhood (1981), Wole Soyinka exposes the hypocrisies of colonialism in an intimate autobiography of his Nigerian youth. Czech poet and playwright Dery takes a similar approach in this spirited memoir of her childhood, beginning in 1975, on the outskirts of Prague. Demonstrating the "nonsense of the system" from a child's view, Dery recounts the cruelties of the Communist regime: her corrupt, wealthy grandparents disown her dissident parents; Dery's father has difficulty finding work; informers are constant. But Dery portrays her exuberant young self and her devoted parents with enormous affection and a contagious, sly humor as she blends political and cultural observations into stories about universal awakenings: at four years old, she's horrified when her parents kill a live carp for Christmas dinner. And as a preteen, she wonders if cleverness and talent matter less than a "nice pair of goats," Czech slang for breasts. The result is a warm, intelligent portrait of childhood and a smart, loving family who challenge a system that threatens "no money, no choice, and no chance." ((Reviewed September 15, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2004 August #1
Poet/playwright Dery makes her English-language debut with a disarmingly sweet and savvy memoir of growing up in Czechoslovakia during the late 1970s and early '80s.She was born in 1975, during the years after the Prague Spring, when life was unpleasant for dissenters like her father. The Dery family (Dominika had one sister) lived in a small town outside Prague. Her mother wrote books for the Economic Ministry, for which others took credit; her father, an economist, took jobs where he could find them, working as a taxi driver for many of the seven years covered here. "Together they had a rare combination: incorruptibility and willingness to fight," writes their daughter. "While life may have been a lot harder than it needed to be, it was the life they had chosen, and they had few regrets." Dery inherited her father's optimism, conveyed in the lovely, childlike pitch and enthusiasm of her prose, and the writing is blessedly free of political moralizing. The family may have been shunned by the community, surrounded by informers, and teetering on the edge of insolvency, but, hey, they owned a St. Bernard that was a film star-beloved by the nation, but unfortunately underpaid. They lived by their wits, making all manner of under-the-table deals that enabled them, for example, to get sole ownership of their house away from the mother's parents (party hardliners who had disowned them) and to send Dery through the ranks of ballet school (a bastion for the party elite). The author's sly humor is evident throughout: she comments on her older sister's developing figure, making witty use of the word in Czech that means both "goat" and "breast"; and she skewers a local busybody who "spoke too fast, running his words into each other. It often sounded like he was speaking Hungarian."Life is hard, and then you laugh-if, like this author, you are wily enough, self-possessed enough, and love the ones you're with as they love you back. Agents: Shannon O'Keefe, Julie Barer/Sandford J. Greenburger Associates Copyright Kirkus 2004 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Library Journal Reviews 2004 September #1
Born to dissidents in 1975, Dominika Dery grows up on the outskirts of Prague in a small village full of prejudices, politics, and petty informing. Largely shunned because of her parents' association with the failed Prague Spring uprising of 1968, Dery seeks solace in her tight-knit family, the friendship of three kind old ladies she dubs her "fairy godmothers," and her love of ballet. Moving from the Brezhnev era of widespread disillusionment and corruption to the relative hope of the Gorbachev years, Dery charts the daily rhythms of life under communism negotiating the black market and weathering the rampant suspicion that atomized most societies behind the Iron Curtain. But this is no cynical memoir it is a touching but clear-eyed testament to a family's will to survive, and even thrive, through the final turbulent years of a terrible regime. Ignore the slightly plodding start and over-the-top Nicholas Sparks quote, and be charmed by Dominika's simple, child's love of life and her stubborn insistence on seeing the good. Highly recommended for larger libraries. [See "Fall Editors' Picks," p. 40-44.] Tania Barnes, Library Journal Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2004 July #4
Born in 1975 in Prague, the daughter of former dissidents of the failed Prague Spring in (then) Czechoslovakia, Dery has penned a memoir collecting tales from her early childhood. She lived in a village outside Prague riddled with Communist informers ever-ready to implicate her father, a sometime taxi driver, and her mother, who ghost-wrote books for the Czech Politburo, in anti-Socialist acts. Dery's maternal grandmother was a powerful member of the Communist elite, her grandfather a famed surgeon; both were very wealthy by Czech standards. After the reform movement was quashed by the Soviets, Dery's mother was banished from the family. Written in an old-fashioned style mimicking the fairy tales Dery loved as a child, this account presents every event-the house flooding while under construction, Dery's rejection by her grandparents when she invites them to her Czech ballet debut, the unpleasant death of the family's St. Bernard-in a vacuum. Dery never veers from the perspective of a very young child, thus providing no context by which to judge the story of growing up in the last years of the Communist state. Still, it's a sometimes charming period piece. Agent, Theresa Park. (Oct. 4) Forecast: With a blurb from Nicholas Sparks, the book may appeal to women readers. Foreign rights have been sold in France, Germany, Italy and Spain. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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