Reviews for Multiplying Menace : The Revenge Of Rumpelstiltskin


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2006 Fall
Kiddie lit's foul-tempered diminutive bad guy crashes the birthday party of the boy whose mother foiled his evil plot ten years earlier by figuring out his name. This time, Rumpelstiltskin wreaks havoc with a magic stick that can multiply whatever he points it at. The brisk, inventive plotting couples with the comically creepy art to create an easy-going-down math lesson. Copyright 2006 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Library Media Connection - November/December 2006
The books reviewed, Beanstalk: The Measure of a Giant and Multiplying Menace: The Revenge of Rumplestiltskin, blend a familiar tale with math skills. However, Beanstalk lacks a story that will engage the young reader, either mathematically or with language. Ratios are a challenging concept to teach and in this book the concept of ratios is not clearly explained. In Multiplying Menace, the mathematical concept is more clearly presented and more easily understood, plus the story is clever and interesting. This book will be more engaging for the young reader and could be used to teach a simple math concept. Beanstalk: The Measure of a Giant- Not Recommended. Multiplying Menace: The Revenge of Rumplestiltskin-Additional Selection. Sharon R. Strock, Teacher, Evening Street Elementary, Worthington, Ohio [Editor's Note: Also available in paperback.] © 2007 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2006 April

Gr 3-6 -It's been 10 years since the queen defeated Rumpelstiltskin by speaking his name, but now he's back to demand repayment for all of the gold he spun for her so many years ago. If she does not oblige, he threatens to increase the pest population and make the kingdom's livestock and other assets disappear by multiplying with fractions. Rumpelstiltskin multiplies the king's nose by six and vows to do the same for the entire royal court, unless Peter, the queen's 10-year-old son, agrees to go with him to work off the debt. It's up to the young prince to take possession of the man's magical multiplying stick and learn how to use it in order to restore normalcy to the kingdom. Calvert has created an interesting vehicle for teaching children about the differences between multiplying with whole numbers and multiplying with fractions. While obviously an educational product, her presentation is creative. Unfortunately, the audience for this book is fairly specific, and, as such, is limited. Children who have not been exposed to these concepts will likely be confused by the math component of the story. In some areas, multiplication of fractions is not taught until the last years of elementary school, but the book's format is unlikely to appeal to them. It's unfortunate, because Calvert has written an enjoyable teaching tool, and Geehan's luminous and expressive paintings are perfect for this fairy-tale world.-Carol L. MacKay, Camrose Public Library, Alberta, Canada

[Page 97]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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