Reviews for Eat Your Math Homework : Recipes for Hungry Minds


Booklist Reviews 2011 September #1
McCallum combines math with cooking in this attractive book. After a brief introduction and a few basic cooking tips, she explains the Fibonacci sequence and shows how to demonstrate it using chunks of fruit on skewers. Fractions are expressed through fried flour tortillas cut into fractional portions; tessellations with two-tone brownies; tangrams with flat cookies; variables and pi with pizza; and probability with trail mix. In six-page chapters, the recipe sounds good, the math is clearly explained, and there's a playfulness of presentation that makes each activity look inviting. The mixed-media illustrations feature dressed rabbits, whose zany attitudes broaden their appeal. A math-review section and a glossary are appended. Although the activities will make lively additions to classroom units, they are also well suited to home use. Witty and smart, this unusually upbeat math book offers edible rewards for learning. Copyright 2011 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2012 Spring
McCallum makes difficult math concepts more accessible by bringing them into the kitchen. Recipes ranging from easy to complex yield foods in shapes and sizes that can be manipulated to illustrate math ideas (e.g., tortillas are cut into halves, thirds, etc., to better visualize fractions). Illustrations star exuberant and goofy bunny chefs. Glos., ind.

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Kirkus Reviews 2011 April #2

Math and cooking have always gone hand-in-hand, but McCallum takes it to a whole new level that allows young number lovers to explore (and eat!) a wide range of mathematical topics.

While the supply list and preparation time may preclude these from actually being assigned as homework, kids who are mathematically minded will enjoy snacking and learning their way through the recipes. Well-written and easily followed, the recipes include Fibonacci snack sticks based on the famous sequence of numbers, fraction chips made from cut-up tortillas, tessellating two-color brownies, milk and tangram cookies, variable pizza pi and probability trail mix. McCallum does not shy away from using appropriate vocabulary, defining it both in context and in the glossary at the back. She also includes fascinating historical tidbits that allow readers to see the precursors of today's math and the mathematicians that first explored them. Hernandez cleverly folds math into her illustrations, too—observant readers will notice the numbers emblazoned somewhere on each character, but only the mathematically informed will figure out their pattern. Her high-energy mixed-media artwork is filled with humorous details, while her cartoon rabbits are likely to remind kids of the Arthur cartoons. Excellent backmatter helps review concepts.

A yummy way to get parents and kids to more deeply understand math...and spend some time together in the kitchen. (index, table of contents) (Nonfiction. 7-12)

Copyright Kirkus 2011 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Kirkus Reviews 2011 July #1

Math and cooking have always gone hand-in-hand, but McCallum takes it to a whole new level that allows young number lovers to explore (and eat!) a wide range of mathematical topics.

While the supply list and preparation time may preclude these from actually being assigned as homework, kids who are mathematically minded will enjoy snacking and learning their way through the recipes. Well-written and easily followed, the recipes include Fibonacci snack sticks based on the famous sequence of numbers, fraction chips made from cut-up tortillas, tessellating two-color brownies, milk and tangram cookies, variable pizza pi and probability trail mix. McCallum does not shy away from using appropriate vocabulary, defining it both in context and in the glossary at the back. She also includes fascinating historical tidbits that allow readers to see the precursors of today's math and the mathematicians that first explored them. Hernandez cleverly folds math into her illustrations, too—observant readers will notice the numbers emblazoned somewhere on each character, but only the mathematically informed will figure out their pattern. Her high-energy mixed-media artwork is filled with humorous details, while her cartoon rabbits are likely to remind kids of the Arthur cartoons. Excellent backmatter helps review concepts.

A yummy way to get parents and kids to more deeply understand math...and spend some time together in the kitchen. (index, table of contents) (Nonfiction. 7-12)

Copyright Kirkus 2011 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2011 May #2

Mischievous, gap-toothed bunnies rendered in mixed-media collage explore math in the kitchen in this clever activity book. Each of the six simple recipes introduces a math concept (for a lesson on fractions, pie-charts demonstrate what it means to cut something into halves, fourths, eighths, etc.), followed by a recipe that challenges readers to apply that concept (such as "Fraction Chips" made from tortillas, or "Milk and Tangram Cookies"). Another recipe instructs readers on how to build snack kebabs by following the Fibonacci sequence, and homemade trail mix provides a hands-on way to experiment with probability. Adult supervision doesn't just apply to the recipes--it'll come in handy for working through the mathematical concepts, too. Ages 7-10. (July)

[Page ]. Copyright 2010 PWxyz LLC

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School Library Journal Reviews 2011 August

Gr 5-7--These edible math projects highlight six significant concepts. Each entry includes a brief narrative explanation, followed by cooking instructions that demonstrate the concept in a practical and hands-on way. From "Fibonacci Snack Sticks" (a simple, no-cook kabob recipe) to the more complicated Tessellating Two-Color Brownies" and "Variable Pizza Pi," the recipes will appeal to most youthful palates. The book is heavily illustrated with digitally enhanced cartoon-style pictures of anthropomorphic animals that, unfortunately, lend the presentation a younger tone than the content demands. Overall, though, larger collections may want to consider this worthwhile attempt to bring math learning into the classroom or family kitchen in a lively way.--Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL

[Page 130]. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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