Reviews for What's a Pair? What's a Dozen?


Booklist Monthly Selections - #2 March 2000
Ages 3^-6. For children who have mastered beginning counting, this mathematical concept book introduces related words and phrases (first, second; uni-and bi-, "baker's dozen," etc.) through visual examples from daily life. Simple, direct sentences accompany lively, full-color photos of children, familiar objects, and scenarios that help explain the concept and add visual appeal. At book's end are a series of questions, inviting participation and review, with answers given both visually and in words. A few concepts ("even" and "odd," in particular) are less successfully treated and may require further explanation. Overall, however, the friendly approach and charming, eye-catching photos help clarify some initially confusing ideas in an entertaining, accessible way. ((Reviewed March 15, 2000)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

----------------------
Horn Book Guide Reviews 2000 Fall
Attractive, full-color photographs and succinct text introduce everyday number vocabulary in contexts familiar to young children--a [cf2]pair[cf1] of boots, a [cf2]triple[cf1]-scoop ice-cream cone, a [cf2]dozen[cf1] donuts. In the second half of the book, readers puzzle over questions such as ""Can you find the pair?"" and ""Who's first in line?"" The numerous color photos feature fresh-faced children casually posed in rustic settings. Copyright 2000 Horn Book Guide Reviews

----------------------
Kirkus Reviews 2000 March #1
Kids in colorful clothing pose for the series of bright color photographs that illustrate numerical terms such as single, pair, first, couple, many, few, odd, and even in a concept book for readers who have graduated from counting. Everything starts with one, begins a panel of pictures that depict a hot-air balloon, a rooster, a dog, and the moon, each cast dramatically against a bold background of blue sky, red barn, or green grass. Color and composition are key in explaining the meaning of couple (two fire engines), triple and third (a third grader holding a drippy triple scoop ice-cream cone), several (a laughing girl s head piled high with hats), or a baker s dozen (a girl holding a box of twelve doughnuts, plus the one which she s about to devour). A unicycle, bicycle, and tricycle are used to illustrate the prefixes uni-, bi-, and tri-, while a series of pairs in the form of horses, boots, or outdoor telephones indicates things in doubles. The text is plain and simple, and halfway through, the book turns to questions, prompting readers to find the pair, the unicycle, the first in line, the even or odd number of friends, ending with, One and one make two. Sometimes that s just the right number. One complaint: with the exception of one photograph, every child in the book is white. That said, this attractive book by the author of Coyote (1999), etc., will inspire many young readers to look for numbers in their own immediate environments. (Picture book. 4-6) Copyright 2000 Kirkus Reviews

----------------------
School Library Journal Reviews 2000 April
PreS-Gr 1-In this well-designed picture book, lively, color photographs of children riding a bicycle, jumping over a ball, lining up, eating a triple-scoop ice-cream cone, or playing in a group illustrate and introduce number-related words. The first page explains that "Everything starts with one." Terms such as "single," "double," "triple," "couple," "several," "few," "many," and "a dozen," and prefixes such as "uni-," "bi-," and "tri-" are introduced. The first half of the book clarifies the concepts, one per page, while the second half is written in the form of a guessing game with questions that enable children to use some of the words. For example, the author writes, "Some games have an odd number of friends." Later, he asks, "Is this an odd or even number of friends?" Children must look at the picture to decide. The answer follows on the next page with another photograph. The clear, engaging photographs are set against plain white backgrounds with large-print, easy-to-read captions. While not a first purchase, this title will expand mathematics collections.-Kristina Aaronson, Bethel Elementary School Library, VT Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

----------------------