Reviews for Inside Apple : How America's Most Admired--and Secretive--Company Really Works


Book News Reviews
Apple, one of America's most envied and admired companies, has been consistently unwilling to share the inner workings of the company and what executives there call its "secret sauce." Lashinsky (senior editor at large, Fortune magazine) offers a penetrating look into the company's inner workings, its unusual operating climate and culture, leadership, its design and branding strategy, and the changes taking place under new CEO Tim Cook. The book should interest readers with a desire to know how what may be the country's highest profile company really works. Business Plan is an imprint of Grand Central Publishing. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Choice Reviews 2012 July
Lashinsky (senior editor, Fortune magazine) provides a glimpse into the corporate mechanisms and structures of Apple to offer a cautiously worded perspective into this legendary behemoth. He weaves together candid tales of its operations along with discussions of the paradoxical Apple culture that mirrored the renegade personality of Steve Jobs--a tightly controlled, outwardly whimsical, yet inwardly grim entrepreneur--seeking excellence, perfection, discipline, and total control yet willing to take risks. Apple's internal management style of multitasking across functions betrays the teachings of most business school gurus, yet Apple's stunning success evokes wonder across the business world. Unlike Walter Isaacson's recent bestselling biography, Steve Jobs (CH, Apr'12, 49-4500), Inside Apple is an unauthorized work. However, Lashinsky's credentials as an experienced technology reporter for a respected publication provide the requisite credibility and skills for producing an honest, unbiased account. Lashinsky interviewed many of Jobs's "disciples," including Scott Forstall (senior vice president, iOS software), Jonathan Ive (senior vice president, design), and, of course, new CEO Tim Cook on how they are handling the transition into the post-Jobs era. These insightful chapters shed light on the probing question: Can Apple foster pervasive change and win without Jobs? Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers; all levels of undergraduate students; practitioners. General Readers; Lower-division Undergraduates; Upper-division Undergraduates; Professionals/Practitioners. J. P. Miller formerly, Simmons College Copyright 2012 American Library Association.

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Kirkus Reviews 2012 January #2
Fortune senior editor at large Lashinsky wonders if the success of Apple can be replicated, or even continued, in the wake of the death of Steve Jobs. The author writes clearly and efficiently but is repetitive in his analysis of this secretive cultural giant. "For years it was an article of faith in Silicon Valley that Apple should not be emulated," he writes. Yet his narrative picks apart Jobs' entrepreneurial philosophy and the company's remarkable post-1997 trajectory--when it first revolutionized personal computing, then introduced the iPod and iPhone--in attempting to discuss such a strategy. One problem, as Lashinsky writes, is the company's cultivated lack of transparency. The author seems to rely on secondary sources, and comments from current and former Apple employees are often unattributed. The basic narrative of Apple's resurgence is well known: After Jobs left his own company due to corporate squabbling, it declined rapidly in the Internet era. Yet Jobs' return in 1997 ushered in a season of risky corporate paring-down, followed by a string of success, starting with the iconic iMac. Jobs introduced compartmentalization and hyper-competitiveness to every aspect of the company. For example, his annual "Top 100" meetings were pointedly exclusionary, which Lashinsky suggests is not the norm at such retreats. Apple as a workplace is portrayed as nearly monastic in employees' willingness to sacrifice their personal lives, remain incommunicado and achieve the extreme interdepartmental cooperation Jobs sought, even at the end. Lashinsky describes Jobs' successor Tim Cook as "a Mr. Fix-it who blended in but didn't take no for an answer." Among other late corporate innovations, Jobs quietly created a management-training program, Apple University, to "record, codify, and teach Apple's business history." Such points allow Lashinsky to support parallel assertions throughout--that Jobs' management style may or may not be transferable, and that Apple's special success may or may not endure once Jobs-approved projects pass through the pipeline. A thorough but flawed attempt to penetrate a corporate icon's blank white shell. Copyright Kirkus 2012 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2012 February #1

Lashinsky, a Senior Editor-at-Large at Fortune magazine, investigates the core of Apple before, during, and after the reign of the late Steve Jobs, not only to discover how the company works and if its success can be replicated, but also to speculate about Apple's future.  In a conversational style that pulls no punches, Lashinsky outlines salient factors that concurrently contribute to Apple's success and deviate from standard business practice. Apple's unique organizational structure places secrecy and detailed design at the fore while using a top-down management style which allows the entire company--including the upper echelon--to focus on creating and marketing elegant products. Apple eschews typical industry practices such as the principal of general management, transparency, or the use of focus groups--the lack of which, Lashinsky claims, sends the message: "We like the dog food so much we eat it ourselves. You won't be disappointed."--even to the point of favoring design over cost-effective production. Lashinsky compiles information about the notoriously secretive company from a variety of sources including media and interviews, though few of the interviewees agreed to be identified. Readers--especially entrepreneurs, technophiles, and businesspeople--seeking an inside peek at the world's most valuable company will find Lashinsky's investigation enthralling and enlightening. (Jan.)

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Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

Lashinsky, a Senior Editor-at-Large at Fortune magazine, investigates the core of Apple before, during, and after the reign of the late Steve Jobs, not only to discover how the company works and if its success can be replicated, but also to speculate about Apple's future.  In a conversational style that pulls no punches, Lashinsky outlines salient factors that concurrently contribute to Apple's success and deviate from standard business practice. Apple's unique organizational structure places secrecy and detailed design at the fore while using a top-down management style which allows the entire company--including the upper echelon--to focus on creating and marketing elegant products. Apple eschews typical industry practices such as the principal of general management, transparency, or the use of focus groups--the lack of which, Lashinsky claims, sends the message: "We like the dog food so much we eat it ourselves. You won't be disappointed."--even to the point of favoring design over cost-effective production. Lashinsky compiles information about the notoriously secretive company from a variety of sources including media and interviews, though few of the interviewees agreed to be identified. Readers--especially entrepreneurs, technophiles, and businesspeople--seeking an inside peek at the world's most valuable company will find Lashinsky's investigation enthralling and enlightening. (Jan.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

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