Reviews for Death in the Family


AudioFile Reviews 2012 April
Unfolding mostly through the eyes of two children, James Agee's somber novel recounts a father's death and its impact on his family. The events of the book move slowly as the story focuses on the emotions and responses of Mary Follet and her two small children, Rufus and Catherine. Lloyd James narrates with a careful cadence, clearly rendering the plot in low tones and making each character distinct. He captures each family member's cautious restraint, revealing the ever present tension between self-control and emotional outburst. The gravity of James's tone suits the solemn occasion of the story, making for a thoughtful and conscientious narration. D.M.W. (c) AudioFile 2012, Portland, Maine

----------------------
Publishers Weekly Reviews 2012 April #1

Agee's classic novel, posthumously published after his death at the age of 45, is considered one of the great American novels of childhood and domestic life, as well as a marvel of Southern literature. The book chronicles the effect of the un-expected death of Jay Follet--who is killed in a car accident after visiting his father--on his wife, son, and brother. Lloyd James narrates gently, kindly, as if wanting to not disturb the mourners in their grief. He tiptoes through the book, confident that his polite, soft reading best suits Agee's bittersweet story. James's words echo across the gaps between sentences and paragraph, and he uses pauses wisely, knowing that Agee's prose resonates in the steadily accumulating drizzle of emotion. There is no need to oversell; the book's rhythms dictate the tone of its narration. A Penguin Classics paperback. (Dec.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

----------------------
Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

Agee's classic novel, posthumously published after his death at the age of 45, is considered one of the great American novels of childhood and domestic life, as well as a marvel of Southern literature. The book chronicles the effect of the un-expected death of Jay Follet--who is killed in a car accident after visiting his father--on his wife, son, and brother. Lloyd James narrates gently, kindly, as if wanting to not disturb the mourners in their grief. He tiptoes through the book, confident that his polite, soft reading best suits Agee's bittersweet story. James's words echo across the gaps between sentences and paragraph, and he uses pauses wisely, knowing that Agee's prose resonates in the steadily accumulating drizzle of emotion. There is no need to oversell; the book's rhythms dictate the tone of its narration. A Penguin Classics paperback. (Dec.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

----------------------