Reviews for But Dad! : A Survival Guide for Single Fathers of Tween and Teen Daughters


Booklist Reviews 2012 March #1
Gross and Livingston are single mothers who have raised daughters. So what qualifies them to write a book about single fathers raising daughters? Their expertise in being female and knowing all about cramps, cliques, makeup, hormones, and eating disorders. Also the fact that so few men have deep knowledge of or are comfortable with those subjects. Speaking from experience as mothers of daughters and as a relationships counselor and a nurse, respectively, the authors are very accessible and matter-of-fact on the challenges a single father is likely to face raising daughters. They note that there are many books addressing mother-daughter issues but very few on father-daughter issues. They explain tween and teen developmental issues and offer strategies for dealing with the particular challenges of raising daughters, whether the father is divorced or widowed. They cover training bras, boyfriends, feminine hygiene, sex, drugs, and alcohol as well as the challenges of developing new routines and traditions as families are reconfigured. A helpful resource for men who may be embarrassed to ask other women for advice on how to raise their daughters. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

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Library Journal Reviews 2013 May #2

Teenage girls can seem like aliens to fathers, and authors Gross and Livingston (Univ. of Vermont) here offer nuts-and-bolts help for everything from nurturing a relationship to choosing a maxi pad. Gearing their work toward the "single dad who may not have a woman in his life with whom to confer about issues-such as sex, friendships, boyfriends, alcohol and drugs, and personal hygiene," the authors take a frank but encouraging approach. In general, they give good, solid advice on normal developmental changes in a reader-friendly format and include bullet lists that fathers can refer to with confidence, such as tips for stocking a bathroom. VERDICT Unfortunately, the authors supply some incorrect information (girls' first average menses is 12, not ten), which conflicts with the American Academy of Pediatrics--a big no-no. While the authors likely meant puberty and not menses, single fathers are unlikely to recognize the editorial oversight, and this is thus a major and unfortunate error.

[Page 65]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2012 March #1

Being a father to a tween or teenage daughter is hard, but it is far more difficult if you're going it alone. Whether rendered a one-man show by divorce, death, or deployment, single fathers face a slew of unique challenges when parenting adolescent girls. They must navigate issues like menstruation, female social development (including the great, dreaded D-word: Dating), the establishment of positive male role models, and more subtle issues, like negotiating new forms of father-daughter physical contact. In addition to these dad-and-daughter topics, the book also contains useful information on general parenting areas, such as fiscal responsibility and setting boundaries. Succinct, direct, and wide-ranging, this comprehensive volume never shies away from uncomfortable topics like anorexia and suicidal ideation. Gross (a single mother and lecturer on human relationships and sexuality at the University of Vermont) and Livingston (an RN) have done an excellent job of creating a thoughtful and readable parenting guide, without getting too preachy or maudlin. However, the authors warn that even if their guide works wonders, don't anticipate an overtly grateful daughter--rather, fathers should expect something along the lines of, "That book just looks stupid, Dad…Don't think you'll find anything in that book that will work on me!" Rest assured, dads--you will. (Mar.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

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Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

Being a father to a tween or teenage daughter is hard, but it is far more difficult if you're going it alone. Whether rendered a one-man show by divorce, death, or deployment, single fathers face a slew of unique challenges when parenting adolescent girls. They must navigate issues like menstruation, female social development (including the great, dreaded D-word: Dating), the establishment of positive male role models, and more subtle issues, like negotiating new forms of father-daughter physical contact. In addition to these dad-and-daughter topics, the book also contains useful information on general parenting areas, such as fiscal responsibility and setting boundaries. Succinct, direct, and wide-ranging, this comprehensive volume never shies away from uncomfortable topics like anorexia and suicidal ideation. Gross (a single mother and lecturer on human relationships and sexuality at the University of Vermont) and Livingston (an RN) have done an excellent job of creating a thoughtful and readable parenting guide, without getting too preachy or maudlin. However, the authors warn that even if their guide works wonders, don't anticipate an overtly grateful daughter--rather, fathers should expect something along the lines of, "That book just looks stupid, Dad…Don't think you'll find anything in that book that will work on me!" Rest assured, dads--you will. (Mar.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

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