Reviews for Library Mouse : A Museum Adventure


Booklist Reviews 2012 May #2
In Kirk's fourth book about his cute little library mouse, Sam and his mouse friend Sarah leave the library to visit a museum. As this is Sam's first foray outside the library, he wants both of them to take an "explorer's journal" to record their adventure--a bad idea, Sarah thinks. The outing gives Sam several frights (dinosaur bones!), but ultimately Sarah takes to keeping a journal, and they return to the library a happy pair. Fans will relish this warmhearted new adventure, which is even more dramatic and visually exciting than the previous entries. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2012 Fall
The Library Mouse and his sidekick venture to the museum next door and encounter an artist--a cat who'd rather draw mice than eat them. This didactic addition to the series features more nods to adult art aficionados (lots of mouse versions of famous paintings) than interest for children. Fans, though, may not mind, and Kirk's art is appealing, if stiff.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2012 March #2

Kirk's fourth book about Sam the library mouse continues the exploration theme of the third book, Library Mouse: A World to Explore, while offering a significant focus on art. Along with Sarah, the adventure-seeking mouse he met in the previous story, Sam makes an after-hours visit to the museum next door, giving Sam his first trip outside the library and introducing both mice to art and artifacts from across the centuries. Kirk revels in the museum environment, and readers (with parental help) will be able to identify works by and allusions to Seurat, Hokusai, Degas, and many more. The mice, though, are a bit wooden, with the same basic expressions whether admiring statuary or running away from the museum's resident artist cat. Ages 4-8. (Mar.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

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School Library Journal Reviews 2012 September

K-Gr 3--There is an inherent connection between libraries and museums, and Library Mouse continues his adventures in a new arena as he encourages budding artists and authors. Daniel Kirk's delightful story (Abrams, 2012) about two mice friends exploring a museum is almost wholly dependent on Kirk's wonderful illustrations for meaning. Chris Sorensen's narration is serviceable, but the production would have benefited from some introductory music or sound effects. This museum adventure makes an ideal listen/read before a unit on journaling or a visit to an art or history museum. Library Mouse, Sam, who is a writer, and his friend, Sarah, an explorer, see marvelous examples of Ancient Egyptian artifacts, knights in shining armor, and a panoply of famous paintings (art details can be accessed at http://www.abramsbooks.com/librarymouse/LibraryMouse_Guide_FINAL.pdf). Along the way, they meet a mysterious, if initially frightening, fellow artist who admires their work. Students will be inspired to bring along their own journals on museum field trips to record their sketches and write about what they see. Librarians, art teachers, and classroom teachers will find the colorful picture book a stimulating and useful tool for their lessons, so make sure it is always available along with the audio version.--Lonna Pierce, MacArthur Elementary School, Binghamton, NY

[Page 66]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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