Reviews for Fables 6 : Homelands


Booklist Reviews 2006 February #1
The last installment of Willingham and principal artist Mark Buckingham's saga of fairy-tale characters in exile, The Mean Sea sons (2005), seemed to tread water after the cataclysm in arch of the Wooden Soldiers (2004) and before more hurly-burly. Home lands,while it reveals the long-sought identity of the Adversary, whose forces drove the exiles out and threaten them still, consists of cloak-and-dagger stuff, however, not warfare. Before the central action resumes, the rather too rudimentarily drawn (by David Hahn) "Jack Be Nimble" follows con-man Jack (famed for his thieving beanstalk capers, among others) for some years after March 's big battle and leaves him hitching farther away. Back to the main drag. Boy Blue, invincibly armed, is in the Homelands, aimed toward the Adversary and offing evil underlings en route. In Fabletown, the sheriff, Beast (Beauty's husband), ferrets out an Adversary mole, and the mayor, Prince Charming, calls in "perpetual tourist" Mowgli to track down absconded Bigby Wolf. Blue winds up in two consecutive stews, and any final ending remains shrouded in the mists of futurity. Lucky us. ((Reviewed February 1, 2006)) Copyright 2006 Booklist Reviews.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 December #2

This clever, enjoyable series written by Willingham, has a rather ingenious premise: what if all the characters of fairy tales lived, loved, schemed, and fought in a modern-day city of their own? This installment contains two fun story arcs. One, a cute satire of contemporary Hollywood, stars Jack, of beanstalk fame, portrayed as a rather unsavory trickster. Making his way to Hollywood with a fistful of cash, he becomes a wildly successful producer of films based on his own mythological exploits. Eventually, though, his ruthless business practices and unsavory past catch up with him. In a longer story, Little Boy Blue goes on an epic quest to find and kill a shadowy tyrant who turns out to be none other than kindly old Geppetto, now a bilious tyrant still longing for his Pinocchio. The more one reads of the series, the more the narrative strands bear thematic fruit. Willingham clearly has an immense amount of fun playing with these characters and their histories, and the art, mostly by Buckingham, is a perfect match: clear, fanciful and finely drawn. Fables is an excellent series in the tradition of Sandman , one that rewards careful attention and loyalty. (Jan.)

[Page 45]. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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