Reviews for Martian Chronicles


AudioFile Reviews 2010 November
This series of interconnecting short stories about life on Mars is not strictly science fiction but rather a thoughtful and elegant exploration of the human condition that just happens to be set on another planet. Scott Brick takes a slow pace that suits the tales, with their old-fashioned language, full of "goshes" and "gees." But the author's style doesn't detract from the power of his text, and Brick's smooth voice imparts all the drama and solemnity of humans making their way in an alien world. His voice trembles with rage and fear, soothes with velvet tones, and captures the drama of a newsreel announcer when talking about rocket ships. Brick is the perfect narrator to bring these classic stories to new listeners. G.D. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award (c) AudioFile 2010, Portland, Maine

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Library Journal Reviews Newsletter
Yes, Fahrenheit 451 and Something Wicked This Way Comes are amazing full-length novels. But Bradbury‚ ôs best, IMHO, was that most intriguing of all fiction types: the short story cycle. Published in 1950, this relates the colonization of Mars. While at first the Martians succeed in repelling the invaders, Earth‚ ôs fourth expedition succeeds, helped along by a plague that has decimated the natives. The trickle of early settlers turns into a river, and soon Mars is very much a copy of the Earth everyone was so intent to leave: rotten. In ‚ úThe Off Season,‚ ù most of the population returns to Earth only to die in a nuclear war. Bradbury‚ ôs eternal hopefulness shines through in the few who have stayed behind become the ‚ únew‚ ù Martians. Lyrical, compelling, and with a strong anticapitalistic streak. -- Douglas Lord, "Books for Dudes", LJ Reviews 7/5/12 (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Library Journal Reviews 1997 March
The Martian Chronicles, widely considered to be sf legend Bradbury's masterpiece, is less science fiction than social commentary on the America of the years immediately following World War II. These stories of Earth's colonization of Mars, including the accidental wiping out of most Martians and a nuclear war back home, are really about what concerned many Americans at the time they were written: the threat of annihilation, conformity, racism, censorship, the promise and fear of technology, and the stability of the family. Bradbury is essentially asking an audience nostalgic for a simpler time to examine the nature of civilization. While his characters and plots seem a bit dated, his themes still resonate. Peter Marinker is an excellent narrator; his wide variety of character voices truly enhance the material. Recommended for all collections. Michael Adams, CUNY Graduate Ctr., New York Copyright 1998 Library Journal Reviews

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Library Journal Express Reviews
This 1950 short story cycle is a future history of the colonization of the Red planet. At first, the Martians repel the invaders, but Earth's fourth expedition succeeds, helped along by a plague that decimates the natives. The trickle of early settlers turns into a river, and soon Mars is a copy of the Earth everyone was so intent to leave-rotten. One story, "The Off Season," relates a nuclear war on Earth and how most of the settlers return there; the few who stay behind become "new" Martians. Lyrical, compelling, and critical of crass consumerism, these tales feel every bit the sci-fi cousin to Bradbury's wonderful Dandelion Wine (1957), a series of short stories centering on the boyhood adventures of awesomely named preteen Douglas in 1920s Illinois. It's hard not to be enthusiastic about these works, which are by turns celebrations and dirges about youth, growth, and innocence, wherein Bradbury's seemingly limitless imagination turns the humdrum-soda fountains! lawnmowers!-into explorations of subjects like human time machines and witchcraft. But Bradbury doesn't just do short stories; his long game is good, too (see the noir gem Let's All Kill Constance). Dude factors: Bradbury's merciless attitude toward his characters-many die-not to mention his knack for exotic locations, be it Mexico, Ireland, or Mars. Also, the man loves libraries (see LJ's video with the writer from last summer's ALA). Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.

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