Reviews for War of the Worlds


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
These adaptations straightforwardly delineate plot points but sacrifice atmosphere, language, and uniqueness. The resulting retellings are stiff and, in the case of already child-friendly fare like [cf2]The Wind in the Willows[cf1] and [cf2]Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm[cf1], somewhat pointless. Spot illustrations are more page-filler than enhancement. Discussion questions and an afterword are appended. There are five other spring 2007 books in this series. [Review covers these Classic Starts titles: [cf2]The Three Musketeers[cf1], [cf2]Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm[cf1], [cf2]The War of the Worlds[cf1], [cf2]The Wind in the Willows[cf1], and [cf2]Dracula[cf1].] Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2006 Spring
In both of these dumbed-down versions, short choppy sentences don't do Wells's language justice. The adapted ending of Time is more optimistic, with the Time Traveler returning to the future as a new Prometheus. Despite the linguistic vandalism in War, the story of a Martian invasion in Britain gets a brief but effective telling. Black-and-white illustrations break up the texts. [Review covers these Stepping Stone Book Classic titles: The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds.] Copyright 2006 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
These adaptations straightforwardly delineate plot points but sacrifice atmosphere, language, and uniqueness. The resulting retellings are stiff and, in the case of already child-friendly fare like [cf2]The Wind in the Willows[cf1] and [cf2]Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm[cf1], somewhat pointless. Spot illustrations are more page-filler than enhancement. Discussion questions and an afterword are appended. There are five other spring 2007 books in this series. [Review covers these Classic Starts titles: [cf2]The Three Musketeers[cf1], [cf2]Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm[cf1], [cf2]The War of the Worlds[cf1], [cf2]The Wind in the Willows[cf1], and [cf2]Dracula[cf1].] Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Library Journal Reviews 2001 May #1
These volumes offer Wells's best-known work and one of his least known. The Sea Lady is one of his many fantasy novels that have been lost in the shadow of his sf. The 1902 story is a utopian nightmare and a predecessor to later works by authors like Orwell and Kafka. The War of the Worlds is Wells's 1898 anticolonialism commentary couched in an sf tale about invaders from Mars. Both volumes have critical texts, scholarly introductions, notes, illustrations, and indexes. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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Library Journal Reviews 1996 May
Leading sf authors Roert Silverberg, Barbara Hambly, Allen Steele, Gergory Benford, Connie Willis, and 14 others imagine H.G. Wells's Martian invasion from points around the world as written by notable 19th-century authors and personages such as Teddy Roosevelt, Picasso, Einstein, Tolstoy, Verne, and Mark Twain. The pieces were all commissioned for this anthology except Howard Waldrop's Night of the Cooters, in which the Martians face the formidable Texas Rangers. A rollicking good compilation, especially Willis's hilarious Emily Dickinson. Highly recommended. Copyright 1996 Cahners Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1996 April #4
Martians! Percival Lowell may have been responsible for bringing them to Earth; Teddy Roosevelt evidently bagged one in Cuba; H.P. Lovecraft may have been one; and both Albert Einstein and Emily Dickinson seem to have played a role in defeating them. In this collection of stories that complement H.G. Wells's classic novel, these and other speculations are entertained by such well-known SF writers as Mike Resnick, Walter Jon Williams, Robert Silverberg, Connie Willis, Barbara Hambly, Gregory Benford and David Brin. One entry, Howard Waldrop's "Night of the Cooters," which concerns Martians and Texas Rangers, is a reprint. The 18 originals center on the reactions of various historical personages to the advent of Wells's invaders, including Picasso, Henry James, Winston Churchill, H. Rider Haggard, China's Dowager Empress, Rudyard Kipling, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Leo Tolstoy, Jules Verne, Mark Twain and Joseph Conrad. Anderson (Climbing Olympus, 1994) has brought together some solid stories here. But since the overarching plot line apes the Wells, variety and suspense take a back seat. The more successful pieces, then, are those like Waldrop's, or Willis's tale of Emily Dickinson's posthumous heroics, which parody the Wellsian universe. Overall, however, this is a far more literate and imaginative tracing of a Martian invasion than the one offered in Martian Deathtrap, reviewed below. (May) Copyright 1996 Cahners Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews
Scientist Changizi (The Brain from 25,000 Feet) kicks off this engaging romp through vision science with a list of the human eye's superpowers: "telepathy, X-ray vision, future-seeing and spirit-reading"; a "theoretical neuroscientist" trained in cognition and biology, he's not kidding. To expose these amazing abilities, and explain the whys of vision (the hows just "make my eyes glaze over"), he poses four challenging questions: "Why do we see in color? Why do our eyes face forward? Why do we see illusions? Why are letters shaped the way they are?" In his answers, Changizi challenges common notions regarding sight. Human color perception, for instance, is based around subtle changes in skin tone which correlate to blood flow, indicating emotions silently-allowing us, in essence, to read the minds of others. Binocular vision, it turns out, is not required for depth perception: in videos game, we "acrobatically navigate realistic virtual worlds as a cyclops." "Future-seeing capabilities" evolved in order to account for a one-tenth-of-a-second lag in perception. A friendly tone, colorful everyday examples and many helpful figures will draw readers-science buffs or not-down the rabbit hole of cognitive theory and keep them there, dazzled. 7 color images, 75 b&w illustrations. (June) Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.

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