Reviews for Gulliver's Travels


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2010 Fall
Gulliver s peripatetic travels are summarized in twelve easy-to-read chapters. Gulliver s encounters with the Lilliputians, the Houyhnhnms, the Yahoos, and others are pointed to offer readers a watery message about how to treat others respectfully. The story hits many highlights of the original text without any of the depth. Black-and-white drawings extend the text. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Fall
These classic stories are presented in unabridged formats. A handful of scratchboard illustrations in addition to a repeating chapter heading spot illustration accompany each story. A ribbon bookmark is attached. The books conclude with some generic open-ended questions. [Review includes these titles: The Jungle Book, Frankenstein, Gulliver's Travels, and Journey to the Center of the Earth.] Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2000 Fall
The weighty prose and social satire of Swift's novel are probably beyond the grasp of most contemporary children, so this adaptation shortens and simplifies the original work and provides margin notes filled with commentary, color photographs, and reproductions that amplify the text. Although they impede the flow of the story, the marginalia are informative and help place the novel in historical context. Copyright 2000 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2006 Fall
These inexpensive condensed versions of classic novels are quickly paced and competently told, with occasional black-and-white illustrations adding spice. Still, one wonders why the adaptations were created in the first place. Some tales (e.g., [cf2]Gulliver's Travels[cf1]) are already suited for children; others gain their depth from complexities of material and language, which is excised here for age-appropriateness. Copyright 2006 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Fall
Horizontal in design, this smooth abridgment of Swift's classic excises some of his crasser references and softens the satire, making it accessible to a younger audience. The abundant paintings and black-and-white drawings resembling etchings perfectly capture the absurdity of characters and situations. If the younger set does need Swift, this generous and affectionate introduction to [cf2]Gulliver's Travels[cf1] is a fine choice. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2005 February #2
A handsomely packaged alternative for readers not quite up for the original, this abridgement pairs a toned-down, quicker-moving but otherwise substantially intact version of Gulliver's four voyages with a generous array of vignettes, larger drawings and paintings-all featuring craggy-featured, elaborately clad (except, of course, for the dignified Houyhnhnms and capering but discreetly posed Yahoos) grotesques in extravagantly detailed settings. Along with providing a better showcase for Riddell's distinctive talents than the cramped pages of Paul Stewart's Edge Chronicles, this makes a timely and enticing replacement for James Riordan's partial retelling, illustrated in a lighter, though less sophisticated, vein by Victor G. Ambrus (1992). (Fiction. 10-13) Copyright Kirkus 2005 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Kirkus Reviews 1992 October
Swift's account of Gulliver's captivity in Lilliput and Brobdingnag is considerably shortened and rephrased here, but Riordan expertly preserves the flavor of the original: upon reaching the temple where he is to stay, the intrepid traveler shamefacedly relieves himself before the tiny multitudes (though the more famous scene where he similarly puts out a palace fire is absent); later, he survives plenty of harrowing adventures, admiringly describing the societies in which he's stranded while taking subtle pokes (and not-so-subtle--``Englishmen are the nastiest race of odious little vermin that Nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth,'' says the king of Brobdingnag) at his own, and at fashion and politics in general. Large or small, Gulliver cuts a heroic figure in Ambrus's pervasive, free-wheeling illustrations; other characters have exaggerated features and a comic air that lighten the satire and serves the narrative well. Swift's ax-grinding can be indigestible in large doses; like other abridged classics from this publisher and illustrator, a palatable, well-blended appetizer. (Fiction. 12-14) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 May #2
Martin Jenkins retells an abridged version of the events in Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift's Gulliver, in an elegant oversize volume, liberally illustrated by Chris Riddell (the Edge Chronicles). Jenkins preserves the conversational tone of Swift's narrator and sticks to the most comical plot points. Riddell's pen-and-ink of Mr. Lemuel Gulliver, tossed off of a lifeboat by gale winds, segues into a wordless full-color spread of the fellow restrained by yards and yards of rope, with which the Lilliputians have tied him down. Other highlights include Gulliver's voyage to Brobdingnag and other points, and then to Houyhnhnms as captain of a merchant ship. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2001 February
Gr 7 Up-Jonathan Swift's satirical novel was first published in 1726, yet it is still valid today. Gulliver's Travels describes the four fantastic voyages of Lemuel Gulliver, a kindly ship's surgeon. Swift portrays him as an observer, a reporter, and a victim of circumstance. His travels take him to Lilliput where he is a giant observing tiny people. In Brobdingnag, the tables are reversed and he is the tiny person in a land of giants where he is exhibited as a curiosity at markets and fairs. The flying island of Laputa is the scene of his next voyage. The people plan and plot as their country lies in ruins. It is a world of illusion and distorted values. The fourth and final voyage takes him to the home of the Houyhnhnms, gentle horses who rule the land. He also encounters Yahoos, filthy bestial creatures who resemble humans. The story is read by British actor Martin Shaw with impeccable diction and clarity and great inflection. If broken into short listening segments, the tapes are an excellent tool for presenting an abridged version of Gulliver's Travels.-Jean Deck, Lambuth University, Jackson, TN Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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