Reviews for Who Stole Halloween?


Booklist Reviews 2005 August #1
Gr. 4-6. Eleven-year-old Alex and his next-door neighbor Yasmin were first seen as sleuths in Who Is Stealing the 12 Days of Christmas (2003). Now, it's Halloween that goes missing--Halloween being a neighbor's cat. Freeman offers a solid mix of misunderstandings, mischief, and mystery as the kids track not only Halloween but also other cats that have been catnapped--some say by a ghost. Is their disappearance linked to two murders that happened in the town more than 100 years ago? A cat was at the center of that mystery, too. There's a lot of super sleuthing here; even Alex's cat, Luau, gets in on the action. By setting the story at Halloween, Freeman is able to use the high jinks of the holiday as the detecting goes on. The explanation of the mystery of the missing cats doesn't quite hold together; but the resolution of long-ago killings is quite gripping (in the name of decorum, the book calls the murdered woman's paramoursweetheart throughout). With kids always hungry for mysteries, this is a good one to have on the shelf. ((Reviewed August 2005)) Copyright 2005 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2006 Spring
With a serial catnapper on the loose and Halloween just around the corner, best friends Alex and Yasmeen wonder if the snatchings are linked to an old ghost story. A handful of clues and a few red herrings will keep readers guessing, but the resolution is a bit too outlandish: the thief turns out to be an animal lover who uses cat fur (shaved) to make homespun remedies. Copyright 2006 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2005 September #2
The trio of sly sleuths from Who Is Stealing the 12 Days of Christmas (2003) is back as Yasmeen, Alex and his cat Luau pursue a serial catnapper in the neighborhood. Visits to the spooky cemetery, the ghost tale of a man who murdered his wife, a weird health food store and suspicious neighbors drum up plenty of red herrings to challenge their deductive skills. Luau is even used as a decoy and gets nabbed. The title refers to the holiday as well as a cat named Halloween. Clever devices will keep the reader guessing. Though events from the first installment are referred to, the story can stand alone. Fans of the Christmas mystery will savor this one, as good as eating Halloween candy, and they'll definitely want a third. Both tricks and treats in this enjoyable younger mystery. (Fiction. 8-11) Copyright Kirkus 2005 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 August #1
And older readers who enjoyed meeting detectives Alex and Yasmeen in Who Is Stealing the 12 Days of Christmas? (which, according to PW, featured "breezy dialogue and some madcap moments") can join the duo on another adventure, Who Stole Halloween? by Martha Freeman. This time the sleuths solve the mystery behind a series of cat-nappings, and in particular a black feline named Halloween. The two pick up plenty of clues and tips from the kooky characters who grace Chickadee Court. Their investigation involves a ghost story, and they find that there is more than one mystery to be solved-plus a satisfying twist. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2005 October

Gr 4-6 -Alex, his remarkable cat, and Yasmeen are back in their second romp that started with Who Is Stealing the 12 Days of Christmas? (Holiday House, 2003). While following Luau into the local graveyard, the two friends find a flyer from a boy in their school asking that his cat be returned. As they investigate, Alex's mom, a local police detective, finds that more and more felines are disappearing, and some witnesses think maybe a ghost is responsible. Legend has it that the Harvey house is haunted because of a murder in 1879. The story unfolds to a satisfying resolution to both mysteries. Characters are well drawn, and the book will entice even reluctant readers with its action and humor. Fans of the first book will enjoy it, but it stands perfectly well on its own.-Debbie Stewart Hoskins, Grand Rapids Public Library, MI

[Page 160]. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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