Reviews for Splish, Splash, Spring


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 April 2001
Ages 3-6. Three playmates and a dog explore all the delights of spring. The raindrops and puddles, baby birds and crocuses, sunshine and wind. They have a perfectly lovely time dashing down a hill, popping up their umbrellas in the rain, mucking in the dirt for earthworms, and getting tangled in kite string. Carr's bouncing rhymes are full of choice adjectives--sloppy and bloomy, swooping and snapping--and there's plenty of visual appeal along with auditory fun. Donohue uses a lush, color-saturated palette for her paper-cut artwork, which is so tactile children will wonder how it's done and want to run their hands across the pages. The blades of grass look pointed, the brick sidewalk is full of bumps, and the kite strings seem real enough to grasp. The appealing pictures are a fine fit for the story premise--children's innocent fascination with the whole world. ((Reviewed April 1, 2001)) Copyright 2001 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2001 Fall
""Sun comes peeking / Hide-and-seeking / Days are playful / Spring's a sprout!"" On a rainy spring day, three friends venture out to stomp in puddles. After the sun appears, they examine crocuses and baby robins and attempt kite flying. The catchy rhyme and the bright, cheerful cut-paper collages complement the energetic escapades of the children as they enjoy the spring day. Copyright 2001 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 2001 March #1
Carr and Donohue revisit the three friends and gray puppy from Frozen Noses (1999), this time to celebrate the highs and lows of spring--although pouring rain doesn't seem like a real low to these children. Cut-paper collage pictures that are reminiscent of bulletin-board art in both color selection and subject matter decorate Carr's singsong verse, although here there is more texture to the choices of paper. Occasionally, layering creates the illusion of three dimensions and the use of string or yarn adds to the depth. The rhymes are somewhat forced ("Spring is sloppy / So raindroppy!" and "Hocus-pocus! / There's a crocus!") though often interesting in the choice of language for such a young audience. The story tells of digging for earthworms and slugs, watching baby birds cheeping for food, splashing in puddles, and picking posies. Playful and cheery, this has a basic appeal, but other titles bring spring activities to life in a more definitive and charming manner. (Picture book 2-5) Copyright 2001 Kirkus Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 2001 May
PreS-Three children and a dog brave the wet weather and go outside to enjoy spring. The catchy, rhyming text describes all of their activities, as they dodge raindrops and splash in puddles. The sun comes out, and they take off their raincoats and fold their umbrellas. They discover baby robins begging for food and help the mother dig up worms. They admire crocuses and daffodils, look at spiders and bees, and do cartwheels down a hill. When a thunderstorm threatens, they run for home, picking flowers along the way. On the last page, one of the children presents the bouquet to a mother waiting at the front door. The colorful cut-paper collages are filled with a variety of interesting textures. The artwork shows the youngsters in constant motion and cleverly depicts their varied facial expressions. Engaging details not mentioned in the text, such as frogs eating bugs, the dog spotting a squirrel in a tree, and a broken string on a kite, will hold young listeners' attention. The bouncy language, bright artwork, and nonstop action make this book a good choice for group sharing.-Anne Parker, Milton Public Library, MA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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