Reviews for Peanut Butter And Jellyfishes : A Very Silly Alphabet Book


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
"[cf2]L[cf1] is for letters that start the word [cf2]llama[cf2]. / [cf2]M[cf1] begins [cf2]motorbike[cf1], [cf2]makeup[cf1], and [cf2]mama[cf1]." Using a rhyming format, this alphabet book lists words beginning with each letter, though there's no overarching theme uniting the whole. Readers can search for the target letter as well as several other words starting with that letter hidden in the textured collage illustrations. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
"[cf2]L[cf1] is for letters that start the word [cf2]llama[cf2]. / [cf2]M[cf1] begins [cf2]motorbike[cf1], [cf2]makeup[cf1], and [cf2]mama[cf1]." Using a rhyming format, this alphabet book lists words beginning with each letter, though there's no overarching theme uniting the whole. Readers can search for the target letter as well as several other words starting with that letter hidden in the textured collage illustrations. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2007 March #2
Billing itself as "very silly" isn't an exaggeration for this zany alphabet book as it pairs letters with corresponding offbeat combinations like Elvis with evergreens and newts with necklaces. Written in a rhythmic rhyme that conjures the verse of Edward Lear, this text reads like a tongue twister and would work best aloud, except when transitioning from the letter G to H, where the rhyme breaks down completely, potentially leaving even an experienced reader tongue-tied. Bright, digital collage illustrations, which experiment with textual patterns and bold colors, can be seen from a distance and sync up well with the text. A short introduction invites readers to pick out slightly hidden elements that reflect the corresponding letter on each page. Busy endpapers provide answers for this challenge, potentially building vocabulary and reinforcing letters. Playful and fun. (Picture book. 4-6) Copyright Kirkus 2007 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2007 April #2

Snyder's cheery collages add some oomph to this hunt-for-the-word alphabet book from the author behind the Words Are Categorical series. Cleary's rhymes point readers to the more obvious words attached to each letter: "D starts dalmatian,/ a dog who's been/ spotted./ E is for each/ evergreen/ Elvis potted." (Yes, as in the King himself.) A short intro also instructs readers to hunt for other representations of the letters (they'll find "D" on the Dalmatian's collar and an "E"-shaped topiary in Elvis's wheelbarrow), as well as other things not specifically referred to in the verse: dragonfly, daisy, daffodils, eggs. The pictures bubble with color and textures, but they're really more decorative than silly. (one Elvis does not frivolous make). Still, there's much busy, bright fun in these pages, and budding abecedarians should find plenty to charm them. Ages 4-8. (Apr.)

[Page 52]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2007 May

PreS-Gr 2 -This ambitious book provides colorful collages, hidden letters, word pictures, and alphabet sentences presented in rhyme while avoiding many of the pitfalls of the genre. By melding together nonsensical sentences that are as wacky as the illustrations, Cleary opens up the field to using verbs and adjectives as well as nouns. "E is for each evergreen Elvis potted." "K starts karate and kangaroos kissing, and kilt-wearing kittens whose kickstands are missing." Both upper- and lowercase are highlighted. The pre-title page invites readers to play along. "Every letter of the alphabet is hidden in the pictures of this book. So are many things that start with each letter." The endpapers list the many objects, including 10 "N" things, 6 "Z" things, and 6 things with "X" in them. For some reason, "G" is squeezed onto the page with "F" and "H," with only five items (including the name of the gerbil). The rhythm of the rhyme falters here, as well. Overall, though, this book will round out an alphabet theme or stand alone as a fun read.-June Wolfe, Bushnell-Sage Library, Sheffield, MA

[Page 114]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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