Reviews for Good Women of a Well- Blessed Land : Women's Lives in Colonial America


Booklist Monthly Selections - # 2 May 2003
Gr. 5-8. The lives of women in colonial America get a fine treatment in this offering from The People's History series. Chapters devoted to Native American women, colonial women in Virginia and New England, and indentured servants and slaves in the colonies are followed by a discussion of the work required of colonial women, their place in society, and changes that took place during the eighteenth century. Miller often uses quotations to bring in the voices of colonial Americans, though sometimes without mentioning sources. Maps and reproductions of period prints and paintings appear throughout the book. The book's subject is very broad; however, the well-written account offers enough solid information to give readers a good sense of the period and enough fascinating detail to keep them interested. Appendixes include a selected bibliography and a partially annotated list of recommended books, articles, and Web sites. ((Reviewed May 15, 2003)) Copyright 2003 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2003 Fall
Thoroughly researched, with numerous quotes from primary sources to add immediacy, this dense but highly readable treatise on the lives of women (including black and Native American women) in colonial America focuses on women's everyday lives and on societal attitudes about women. Sepia-toned reproductions of historical art portray women performing various tasks. Bib., ind. Copyright 2003 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 2003 July
Gr 5 Up-In this fascinating account, the author addresses a part of history that is often neglected in traditional texts. Chapters progress chronologically, beginning with Native American women, whose lives were centered in the village or home, and who were involved in farming, building shelter, tanning hides, and sewing clothing. As women emigrated from Europe to the New World to become wives of settlers, they endured many similar demands. Miller tells of the numerous challenges, hardships, and overwhelming trials they faced, and readers will understand their role in a male-dominated society as well as the social history of this period. Other sections tell of women as indentured servants, and as slaves. Sepia-colored reproductions and maps scattered throughout the text depict various historical events and pique readers' interest. The efficient use of language results in an easy-to-understand text. The bibliography is extensive. As the author makes clear, women were obviously vital to the success of the Colonies.-Susan Shaver, Hemingford Public Schools, NE Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2004 October
Gr 5 Up-A fascinating account of the lives of females during this era. From Native women to those who came from Europe as wives or indentured servants to those who were forced into slavery, the book chronicles the hardships they endured and contributions they made. Period drawings and archival photographs add interest. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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VOYA Reviews 2004 August
This clearly written and well-researched book recounts the hardships that women faced as they struggled to build lives in Colonial America. The author draws on letters, court records, passenger ship lists, and other primary sources to offer valuable information about the lives of Native American, European, and African American women from the 1600s to the beginning of the American Revolution. The text flows, making difficult issues clear and understandable to middle school level students. The author touches on issues rarely explored in historical accounts, such as the campaign to bring single women from England to the Colonies, where they were all but guaranteed to find a husband. Many of them, however, lost their lives on the journey to America or chose to return to England once they experienced the harsh realities of life in the Colonies. The women who stayed played a vital role in shaping the future of this country. Black-and-white reproductions of women engaged in manual labor and household chores demonstrate the challenges of daily life for women in a patriarchal society. Especially compelling is the section describing the living and working conditions of indentured servants and slaves. Isolated from loved ones and abused by their masters, they formed new friendships and found ways to endure. The author does not paint an entirely bleak picture; she offers inspirational anecdotes of women who fought back against a society that mainly regarded them as property. The bibliography is useful and extensive in this resource that is highly recommended for middle school and public libraries.-Deborah Fisher Index. Illus. Biblio. 5Q 3P M J Copyright 2004 Voya Reviews.

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