Reviews for Double-Dare to Be Scared : Another Thirteen Chilling Tales


Booklist Reviews 2004 June #1
Gr. 4-8. San Souci, master of the chilling last line, follows up his Dare to Be Scared [BKL O 1 03] with this equally entertaining collection of 13 tales. In most of the stories, he takes the seed of a folktale or urban legend and places it in a modern setting, making the situations even more frightening. Most of the main characters are menaced by a variety of scary, unexpected threats: a madman in the woods, a giant spider, unforgiving leprechauns, and exceptionally hungry Appalachian children. There's no doubt as to a central character's fate, yet the description is brief, leaving a great deal to the reader's imagination. A few of the stories don't quite deliver the expected frights, but that won't keep this collection from finding a large and eager audience. ((Reviewed June 1 & 15, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

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ForeWord Magazine Reviews 2004 May/June
To a reader between the ages of eight and twelve, a double dare is pretty serious business. This collection of thirteen short stories draws from folklore and popular cultural myths to double-dare youngsters to get spooked. Some of the stories end with strange twists, such as the dead boy who returns to his friend; others end alarmingly, like the story of the young ghost who goes back to her former home to secure a playmate. "Daddy Boogey" is a scarecrow that really scares seven-year-old Andy. His teenaged brothers capitalize on this fear to tease and torment Andy, until the teenagers are found hanging from the scarecrow's crossed poles. "Mountain Childers" are very weird children who live way back in the hills where Daniel is on vacation. The boy befriends an older couple, only to find that the "childers" are taking over their lives. And a "Campfire Tale" scares two adults literally to death. The black-and-white pen illustrations are really creepy-looking and certainly add flavor to the stories. Each story is prefaced by a small drawing, and in the middle of each tale, a full-page picture neatly fills in the blanks that the imagination leaves. San Souci has written several scary books based on myth, legend, and countryside tales for both children and adults. His straightforward tale telling and easy-to-read style are appealing to young readers. He has authored two Caldecott Honor Books and two Aesop Award winners, and he created the screen story for Disney's Mulan. This title follows his popular Dare to Be Scared: Thirteen Stories to Chill and Thrill, also eerily illustrated by Ouimet. These stories are certain to stimulate the imagination and slake young readers' thirst for the unusual, the bizarre, and the chilling. They will double-dare readers to venture into unknown territory. Copyright 2004 ForeWord Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2004 Fall
A bullied boy exacts revenge on his tormentors after his death; a group of friends visit a haunted house; a girl stays out past her curfew--with catastrophic results. Illustrated with atmospheric art, these eerie tales are individually effective, but there's a sameness to the conclusions (most end with the protagonist dead or about to be killed) that makes the volume seem repetitive. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2004 June #1
San Souci follows up Dare to Be Scared (2003) with 13 more eerie tales, original but laced with tried and true locales, motifs, and dreadful fates. He leaves his monsters a bit vague around the edges, so that readers can fill in details: after a scary "Campfire Tale," young Michael hears a twig snap right behind him; a spidery cloud of "Grey" turns out to be a mind-bending alien; a sinister pair of "Mountain Childers" always talk with their mouths closed; an old carpet in an abandoned house suddenly turns into a tongue. Victims are mostly third- to fifth-graders, and the author tones down explicit gore to the occasional rolling head or shoe with a foot still inside. Still, enhanced by Ouimet's macabre tableaux (finished art not seen), these tales rate high in chill factor for any age. Warmly recommended for solitary, late-night, under-the-covers reading. Bwaa-ha-ha. (Short stories. 10-12) Copyright Kirkus 2004 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2004 June
Gr 4-8-The creators of Dare to Be Scared (Cricket, 2003) once again combine their talents to present deliciously frightening tales. As in the first book, San Souci uses elements of urban legend and folklore to weave powerful and suspenseful yet age-appropriate stories that youngsters will revisit, finding new meaning with each reading. Malicious ghost children, demon cooties seeking revenge, haunted houses, and hungry creatures leap from the pages and into readers' imaginations with spine-tingling results. In one particularly eerie selection, a silent-movie character that terrified audiences in the early 20th century is resurrected and plans to continue scaring people by using the Internet. Each story is about 10 pages long, just right for sharing aloud or for independent reading during short time periods. The narratives are plot focused, leaving many details to the imagination. Ouimet's scratchboard illustrations create a surreal mood and are strategically placed for the most impact. Dare and Double-Dare are ideal choices for graduates of Alvin Schwartz's "Scary Stories" series (HarperCollins).-Molly S. Kinney, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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