Reviews for Waynetta and the Cornstalk : A Texas Fairy Tale


Booklist Reviews 2007 May #2
"Fee, fie, foe, fits, / I'll cook myself some cowgirl grits!" In this funny, feminist, fractured version of Jack and the Beanstalk, the hero is a girl, and her helper is a giant's wife. Waynetta and her ma work as "hard as eight-legged mules" on their scrubby Texas ranch. Still, they barely scrape by until Waynetta discovers a magic cornstalk. After climbing to the top, she finds an enormous ranch owned by a giant and his wife. The giant's wife helps Waynetta hide from the huge, mean rancher until he falls asleep. Then Waynetta lassoes a longhorn that makes cowpats of gold, brings the cow home to Ma, and climbs the cornstalk again in search of more treasure. The ending, in which the giant is transformed into a sweet ranch worker, is a little lame. But the action-packed, neon-colored illustrations match the uproarious, tall-tale fun. Kids will enjoy the Wild West setting and the story of the bad grown-up who is outwitted by the small hero.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
This Texas "Jack and the Beanstalk" has cowgirl Waynetta climbing a cornstalk to find a ranch in the sky owned by a nasty giant cowboy. Waynetta retrieves her family's treasures, including a longhorn that produces golden cowpats, and tames the giant. The country expressions add regional flavor (though they get a bit tiresome). The boldly colored illustrations are appropriately larger than life. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
This Texas "Jack and the Beanstalk" has cowgirl Waynetta climbing a cornstalk to find a ranch in the sky owned by a nasty giant cowboy. Waynetta retrieves her family's treasures, including a longhorn that produces golden cowpats, and tames the giant. The country expressions add regional flavor (though they get a bit tiresome). The boldly colored illustrations are appropriately larger than life. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2007 February #1
This Wild West version of Jack and the Beanstalk is sure to have readers breaking out their ten-gallon hats and asking for some southwestern fare. Waynetta and her Ma own a hardscrabble ranch in Texas, but one long dry summer threatens to put them under. That is, until the last of the longhorns is traded for a handful of magic corn guaranteed to bring luck. At the top of the cornstalk, Waynetta finds just that luck in three things a mean giant stole from her family years ago: a longhorn that produces gold cowpats, a lariat that never misses and a bucket that never empties. It takes two trips and a brave face-off against the giant, but the feisty heroine manages to capture all three. In the process, she reforms the giant, making for a less violent ending. Greenseid's illustrations perfectly suit this Texas fairy tale. Her palette is filled with greens, yellows, reds and browns, while her characters sport stereotypical western attire. There'll be a showdown at any library not stocking this title. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2007 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

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Library Media Connection - October 2007
In this clever retelling of "Jack and the Beanstalk," Waynetta and her ma are working hard on their poor Texas ranch. Waynetta's mother tells her to sell their last longhorn, but instead Waynetta trades it for a handful of magic corn. Ma throws the corn out the window and overnight a large cornstalk sprouts. Waynetta climbs the stalk, determined to find some luck. Her climb takes her to a huge ranch, run by a mean, giant cowboy who stole a number of things from Waynetta's mother years before. With the help of the giant's wife, Waynetta manages to get back the longhorn that drops golden cowpats, the magic lariat that never misses, and the bucket that never runs out of water. When the giant chases Waynetta down the stalk he comes crashing to the ground. Happily, the fall knocks all the meanness out of the giant, and he and his wife stay on to help Waynetta and her mother on the ranch. This imaginative and humorous story and equally humorous and colorful illustrations combine to make this a rollicking, fun read. Recommended. Gregory A. Martin, Curriculum Materials Center Librarian, Assistant Professor of Library Science, Cedarville (Ohio) University © 2007 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2007 April

K-Gr 3-- Spunky cowgirl Waynetta and her mother live on a ranch where the lack of water has forced them to sell all but one of them. Finally, Ma has to ask her daughter to sell that "sorry-looking critter," but instead the girl exchanges it for some magic corn. In this exuberant reworking of "Jack and the Beanstalk," Waynetta reaches the top of a giant cornstalk to find "the biggest ranch she'd ever seen." Then she walks to the front door (readers must surmise that it belongs to a house) and is greeted by a giant woman who says, "I reckon you've come to take back the things my husband stole from your ma years ago." The giant, who looks like an old Wild West villain, arrives chanting, "Fee, fie, foe, fat,/I think I smell a cowgirl brat!/Fee, fie, foe, feet,/chicken-fried cowgirl is what I'll eat!" While Waynetta hides behind a giant-size bowl of beans, he brings out his treasures, "a longhorn no bigger than a barn cat" that deposits "a golden cowpat," a lariat that "never misses," and a "thimble-sized bucket" that "never runs out of water." Watercolor images in varying shades of brown with dramatic splashes of purples, reds, greens, and blues depict Waynetta's rickety old house surrounded by broken fences and desert landscape. A gun-toting, ax-wielding mother and other exaggerative characters accompany the rich Texan parlance that peppers this amusing read-aloud.--Kirsten Cutler, Sonoma County Library, CA

[Page 108]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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