Reviews for Piper Reed : The Great Gypsy


Booklist Reviews 2008 July #1
A sequel to Piper Reed, Navy Brat (2007), this appealing chapter book continues the story of nine-year-old Piper, her two sisters, her mother, and her father, a navy man who has just left for six months at sea. Dyslexic and a middle child, Piper sometimes feels outshone by her siblings, but she begins to see where her strengths lie as events unfold, and she even discovers a book that she enjoys reading. Piper's first-person narration will win over many readers with its accessible depiction of a family's ups and downs. One significant event, when Piper's mother falls downstairs and breaks her leg, is told in a refreshingly unconventional manner: each girl writes a letter to her father, supposedly to inform him of the event and clearly to place the blame on another sister. Besides providing droll reports of the event, the letters clearly contrast the sister's personalities. Davenier's line-and-wash drawings illustrate the episodic story with wry humor. Copyright 2008 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2009 Spring
In her second book, Navy brat Piper's optimistic outlook never flags, even with changes afoot. This appealing Navy family is loving without being cloying, strong without being perfect, and optimistic without seeming unbelievable. The black-and-white illustrations are as down-to-earth as the Reeds and move the episodic story along without intruding. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2008 #5
Where is home? For Navy brat Piper Reed, it's that place she's always moving away from: at nine, she has already lived in six places. Now, with her father, Chief, away at sea for "six long months," she is settled into her current house on the naval base in Pensacola, Florida. In this second book, Piper's optimistic outlook never flags, even with changes afoot: new neighbors; Christmas without Chief; the death of little sister Sam's beloved goldfish, Peaches; plans for the big Gypsy Club pet show in the spring. When Mom falls and breaks her leg, it takes a visit from relatives to keep the family going. Then, unexpectedly, Chief comes home early. Unlike Sam, Piper is no prodigy, but she discovers her own special talents on an end-of-the-summer vacation. Davenier's familiar black-and-white illustrations are as down-to-earth as the Reeds are, and they move the episodic story along without intruding. This appealing Navy family is loving without being cloying, strong without being perfect, and optimistic without seeming unbelievable. We salute you, Piper! On to the next adventure! Copyright 2008 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

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