Reviews for Halloween Hoots and Howls


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 September 1999
Gr. 2^-5, younger for reading aloud. Pictures and words strike the same winsome, wacky tone in this volume of Halloween poetry. Horton uses many old Halloween puns, working them into a collection that includes both the spooky and the funny. Her long poem "A Halloweeny Quiz" lists 10 riddles: "What streets do ghosts haunt when they're out with their friends? SCORE A POINT IF YOU SAID `DEAD ENDS.'" Joann Adinolfi combines pastels with watercolors and gouache in a series of sprightly pictures that extend and illustrate the poems to perfection, never overwhelming them. Some of the pictures use an almost pointillistic technique--tiny dots with jaunty lines for emphasis. Be sure children read the gravestones on the endpapers for additional laughs. ((Reviewed September 1, 1999)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2000 Spring
From a pumpkin's lament to Frankenstein's trip to the grocery store, this poetry collection celebrates the Halloween season and is full of scary playfulness, rollicking rhythms, and surprise endings. The pages are decorated with stylized, wacky illustrations, and amusing gravestone epitaphs are found on the endpapers.Copyright 2000 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1999 September #4
In zesty, candy-corny poems from a first-time author, a witch places an ad for a "Turbo broomstick (color jet)/ With dual exhausts. FM cassette." Dr. Frankenstein shops for heads of cabbage and ears of corn, and a top-notch "Halloweeny Quiz" offers 10 diverting riddle-couplets that work as verse and as a game. The mixed-media cartoons, on white or airbrush-speckled backgrounds, anticipate but never upstage the inventive punch lines. Ages 4-7. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1999 October
Gr 2-4-A deliciously silly collection of Halloween poems, rhymes, and jokes. The cover sports the profile of an appropriately green witch with blue lips and sufficiently hairy warts. Her wide grin promises laughter within. In fact, some of the more clever rhymes appear just inside the front and back covers as tombstone epitaphs. For example, "Beneath this slab lies Lennie Lixer. He fell into a concrete mixer. Poor stiff," and "Danny Dimm was not too bright. He ate a stick of dynamite. Rest in Pieces." Longer poems include "Woe Is Me," which chronicles the indignant complaints of an unwilling pumpkin turned jack-o'-lantern, and "There's a Spider on the Ceiling," which describes a speedy and spooky accumulation of spiders in a child's room. The selections have a perfect mix of fright and humor and are most effective when read aloud. Strikingly stylized, angular illustrations are combined with a clever layout. The poem "When a Skeleton Gets Creaky," which recommends a "liniment and coffin syrup" for "aching bones," is set within an illustration of a medicine bottle, and "Bedtime," which warns of hungry "beasties," appears on the coverlet of a coffin-shaped bed with skeleton-head bedposts. Adinolfi's choice of color (shades of green, purple, and orange) also creates a jaunty playfulness. A festive addition to any collection serving young trick-or-treaters.-Alicia Eames, New York City Public Schools Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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