Reviews for Night Before Christmas : A Goblin Tale


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2004 Spring
The traditional Clement Moore text is paired with art depicting a family of goblins visited by St. Nick. Living under the roots of a tree, the green creatures get a bit rambunctious when Santa arrives, pawing through his sack of toys and even hitching a ride on his sleigh. This offbeat holiday entry features dark illustrations, making it sometimes difficult to see the goblins in action. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2003 November #1
A traditionally depicted Santa and his reindeer arrive at a spooky, underground home to deliver presents on Christmas Eve. Though the text is familiar, this family is quite different: green goblins with buggy eyes, pointed ears, and three toes on each foot. The father goblin narrates the poem as in most versions, but the ten goblin children stop dreaming of sugarplums (bugs and worms) to join in the action. They pounce on Santa, grab the toys, and chase the terrified elves, until Santa fills all the stockings--with the little goblins. He escapes to his sleigh, hog-tying the goblins that still cling to his legs, with one goblin peeking out from the pack of toys on the final, wordless page. The juxtaposition of the familiar poem with the hilarious goblins makes a funny parody, and the naughty (but cute) goblin children add a new note of Christmas cheer to the old words. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2003 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2003 September #4
According to Rogers's (Tiptoe into Kindergarten) visual interpretation, goblins celebrate Christmas much like humans do. In this inventive outing, Moore's much-loved poem serves as tame backdrop for the action in Rogers's vividly imagined acrylic paintings. Saint Nicholas arrives at a friendly goblin family's underground home and receives a hearty welcome from the large, boisterous brood. After some playful roughhousing, Santa fills the clan's array of three-toed stockings and politely declines a plate of bug-chip cookies before heading back into the night. Kids, especially those already familiar with Moore's verse, will have a blast poring over the dank, mossy-but somehow cozy-environs of Rogers's fuzzy-pated, bulbous-eyed creations. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2003 October
PreS-Gr 3-By changing the setting to a goblin family's den, Rogers breathes fresh life into this classic poem without altering a single word. In a mossy and snake-infested den, the jolly and familiar old man is set upon by bulgy-eyed, exuberant little creatures. Without losing his twinkle, St. Nick and his alarmed elves go about their work and then whisk back up the chimney, inadvertently taking the naughty goblins with them. Unfazed, Santa takes care of the hitchhikers "ere he drove out of sight-." The delectably detailed illustrations and the monstrously ill-behaved but adorable little goblins ensure that kids will clamor for this subversive version of the old chestnut again and again.-E. M. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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