Reviews for Peter and the Shadow Thieves


Booklist Reviews 2006 June #1
Gr. 5-8. In this second prequel to the adventures made familiar by J. M. Barrie and Walt Disney, which builds on the events of Peter and the Starcatchers (2005), two veteran writers for adults do not disappoint. Sustaining the first book's lively pace are short chapters packed with action and well-chosen details--both icky (Peter and the bucket of excrement!) and marvelous (the pitch-perfect sound of Tink's exasperation). An evil force is once again trying to obtain starstuff, the magical substance that, among many other qualities, enables Peter to fly and to remain eternally youthful. Peter must visit London to help his friend Molly and her family of starcatchers, leaving the boys on Mollusk Island at the mercy of Hook. Squalid London streets, aristocratic mansions (one of which houses a young George Darling), and even Stonehenge make atmospheric backdrops for bouts with pirates, wolf packs, and a deliciously creepy villain who steals souls from shadows. Readers will relish the chance to further explore the backstory of a favorite childhood tale, and hope for a third installment. ((Reviewed June 1 & 15, 2006)) Copyright 2006 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
Peter and Tinker Bell ([cf2]Peter and the Starcatchers[cf1]) journey from Mollusk Island to London to warn Starcatcher Molly about the evil Others. Peter, Tink, and Molly must stop the Others, who are intent on obtaining magical starstuff from Molly's father. A surfeit of plot lines and villains (including Captain Hook, back on the island) slows down and confuses the adventure. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
Peter and Tinker Bell ([cf2]Peter and the Starcatchers[cf1]) journey from Mollusk Island to London to warn Starcatcher Molly about the evil Others. Peter, Tink, and Molly must stop the Others, who are intent on obtaining magical starstuff from Molly's father. A surfeit of plot lines and villains (including Captain Hook, back on the island) slows down and confuses the adventure. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2006 June #1
The co-authors of Peter and the Starcatchers (2004) go to the same well, and that would be one trip too many. When the evil Others come back with a powerful new ally to recover the trove of supernal Starstuff rescued in the first episode, Peter reluctantly leaves Mollusk Island ("Never Land") to deliver a warning to Molly (Wendy's mother-to-be) and the other Starcatchers. Despite introducing a chilling, Dementor-like bad guy in the person (or whatever) of soul-seizing Lord Ombra, and pacing cranked up by dozens of quick point-of-view cuts, so dependent is the plot on repetitive set pieces-how many times will Ombra ooze into another clueless victim's shadow? Or Tinkerbelle use her flashbulb trick to daze some attacker?-that the melodrama soon takes on a labored cast. Overstuffed with narrowly typecast characters and featuring a bulky side plot shoehorned in apparently just to keep Captain Hook and the Lost Boys in sight while the other players are off in London, this formulaic sequel shows two writers for adults who are just going through the motions. (Fantasy. 11-13) Copyright Kirkus 2006 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Library Media Connection - February 2007
In this sequel to Peter and the Starcatchers (Hyperion Books for Children/Disney Worldwide Publishing, 2004), Peter and Tinkerbell travel to London to help Molly thwart the Others' plans to recapture the coveted stardust. Slank has joined forces with Captain Nerezza and the terrifying Lord Ombra, a dark creature who is not quite human, possessing strange powers to control the minds of others. A minor secondary plot involves Captain Hook's attempts to kidnap the Lost Boys. Like the first work, this is a classic page-turner with short chapters and constant action. Nineteenth-century London is wonderfully depicted in Dickensian terms, where it rains constantly, thieves and tricksters prey upon the poor, and the wealthy live above and apart from it all. George Darling is cleverly introduced as Molly's neighbor and friend, and their budding romance is deftly described. And, although Lord Ombra and his powers are vaguely familiar and predictable, he is also just the right amount scary for younger readers. All in all, this is a thoroughly enjoyable and rollicking adventure with a tightly constructed plot, lots of suspense, and a nice dash of humor. Highly Recommended. Amy Hart, Head, Bibliographic Services, Minuteman Library Network, Natick, Massachusetts © 2007 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2006 June #4
Just in time for summer reading festivities comes a plethora of series additions and favorite characters. "Peter Pan fans will find much to like in a what-if scenario that pays respectful tribute to the original," said PW of Peter and the Starcatchers. Peter and Tink depart Mollusk Island (where they landed in the previous book) for London in Peter and the Shadow Thieves by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson. But en route, they encounter creepy Lord Ombra, a cloaked, oozing part-creature/part-man obsessed with possessing the missing starstuff. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Review 2006 August

Gr 4-7 In this sequel to Peter and the Starcatchers (Hyperion, 2004), trouble arrives at Mollusk Island (otherwise known as Never Land) in the form of a ship filled with nefarious characters searching for the trunk of starstuff that the Starcatchers spirited away in the first book. When the bad guys, led by nonhuman Lord Ombra, learn that it is in London, they sail off in pursuit, and it takes the combined efforts of Peter, Tinker Bell, and Peter's friend Molly's Starcatcher family to ensure that it is returned to outer space before Lord Ombra can use it to rule the world. Kids won't have to have read the first book to dive headfirst into this one; it is filled with enough rollicking, death-defying adventure to satisfy anyone. Readers familiar with James Barrie's Peter Pan (or even the Disney animated version) will immediately recognize and enjoy familiar characters, but it is when the action switches to London that the plot really starts to sizzle. Breathless chases and near-death experiences are spiced with a miasma of Dickensian squalor, creating scenes that are rich in color and action if short on in-depth characterization. This should appeal to fantasy and adventure fans alike.Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library

[Page 113]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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VOYA Reviews 2006 July
Peter Pan, Tinker Bell, and Captain Hook are back in this delightful sequel to the popular Peter and the Starcatchers (Hyperion, 2004/VOYA December 2004). The story begins with Peter and his fellow orphans living comfortably on the remote Mollusk Island, which they have dubbed Never Land. Molly, the intrepid heroine of the first book, is back in London with her parents, who are guardians of a powerful substance known as "starstuff." Peter's only problem is boredom, which he alleviates by taunting Captain Hook and the other marooned pirates. Peter also feels uneasy because the powers he has obtained from the starstuff, including the ability to fly and to never grow old, have forever set him apart from his friends. The peace of island life is shattered when the sinister Lord Ombra and his henchmen come searching for the starstuff. Ombra discovers the starstuff is in London with Molly's family, so Peter and Tink undertake a dangerous journey to warn Molly. Peter makes it to London in time to rescue Molly, but Molly's mother is kidnapped by Ombra. This sequel is even better than its predecessor, with all the excitement and magic but more drama and suspense. Lord Ombra is a frightening and formidable villain, a not-quite-human creature who has the ability to control people by stealing their shadows. There is not quite as much humor here, but the more complex characters and relationships make the story more compelling. It is an exciting, rousing read perfect for fantasy adventure fans.-Amy Luedtke 5Q 5P M J Copyright 2006 Voya Reviews.

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