Reviews for Eternity Code


Booklist Reviews 2003 June #1
Gr. 6-9. Could this be Artemis Fowl's last caper? His father, who was rescued from the Russian Mafia in Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident (2002), seems to have turned over a new leaf. But Artemis resolves to do one last job, a job that involves a supercomputer cube he created with stolen fairy technology. Things go totally awry, however, when his proposed pigeon--a billionaire American businessman--turns the tables and Artemis' longtime bodyguard, Butler, is fatally shot. Artemis puts Butler on ice, literally, and calls on Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon fairy police for help. The existence of the cube is a threat to the fairy world, and Artemis concocts a convoluted scheme to recover it. As in the previous two books in the series, the action is fast and furious, the humor is abundant, characterizations are zany, and the boy genius works wonders--all of which add up to another wild ride for Artemis' fans. ((Reviewed June 1 & 15, 2003)) Copyright 2003 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2003 Fall
Artemis and Captain Holly Short are at it again, this time attempting to thwart the evil Spiro's theft of an ingenious device Artemis has designed that (inadvertently) puts the fairy world in danger. There's plenty of snappy dialogue, badass posturing, and blow-by-blow fight scenes, but by the end the characters and story are right back where they started, which means that the next book in the series is completely free to do the same thing all over again. Copyright 2003 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2003 March #5
Even better than The Arctic Incident, this third fantasy thriller starring Artemis Fowl pits the 13-year-old criminal mastermind against his most cunning adversary yet-American billionaire Jon Spiro, owner of the high-tech firm Fission Chips. Artemis Fowl's father, while recuperating from the brush with death he suffered in the last installment, makes a stunning announcement: he wants the family to turn over a new leaf and hew to the straight and narrow. Fortunately for readers, Artemis has other plans. "One last adventure, then the Fowls could be a proper family," he decides. After all, what could go wrong? Everything, as it turns out. Artemis's scheme to extract one metric ton of gold from Spiro, in exchange for keeping the C Cube-a beyond-state-of-the-art computer he's built using pirated fairy technology-off the market, backfires spectacularly. In order to save Butler, his bodyguard, and set things back to rights in the fairy world, Artemis joins forces with Butler's sister Juliet and drafts the help of the usual suspects (elf captain Holly Short, computer-geek centaur Foaly, flatulent dwarf Mulch Diggums). Once again, Colfer serves up a high-intensity plot involving cryogenics and a mobster mentality as the action hurtles toward the climactic break-in at Chicago's Spiro Needle. Agile prose (Jon Spiro is "thin as a javelin" ), rapid-fire dialogue and wise-acre humor ("Goblins. Evolution's little joke. Pick the dumbest creatures on the planet and give them the ability to conjure fire") ensure that readers will burn the midnight oil to the finish. (The ending leaves the door wide open for yet another sequel.) Ages 12-up. (May) FYI: A one-day laydown on May 6 and a 10-city author tour are planned. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information. #

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School Library Journal Reviews 2003 July
Gr 5-8-Antihero Artemis Fowl, now 13 years old, is back. He has used stolen fairy technology to create a supercomputer known as the "C Cube," which will render all existing technology obsolete. He meets with Jon Spiro, head of "Fission Chips," with a proposition. For a price, he will suppress his cube, and allow Spiro time to sell his potentially worthless stocks and buy into Fowl Industries. Spiro double-crosses Artemis, and in the ensuing melee he steals the C Cube and Artemis's bodyguard, Butler, is murdered. The scene is totally out of James Bond; one fully expects to hear the familiar theme music and to see the credits as it concludes. The action does not let up as Artemis teams with the fairy policewoman Captain Holly Short and other companions to bring Butler back to life, and then to retrieve the Cube from Spiro's Chicago fortress. The plot is filled with crosses and double crosses, unmarked vans, and impenetrable security systems. It's exciting stuff, but the writing is often clichéd at worst, and merely workmanlike at best. Butler's death scene is particularly hackneyed, echoing every overly dramatic death scene one can think of. Still, this latest adventure is sure to be popular with fans of the series.-Tim Wadham, Maricopa County Library District, Phoenix, AZ Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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VOYA Reviews 2003 October
Thirteen-year-old master criminal Artemis Fowl has promised his father that he will go straight, but not before he has celebrated one last illicit triumph. Fowl wants to make an under-the-counter deal with Jon Spiro, a Chicago businessman with serious mob connections. The boy has created a new super-computer, the C Cube, using illicit fairy technology, and he has convinced Spiro that the machine would do serious damage to his financial empire if Artemis sells it to competitors. Instead, he proposes accepting a bribe from Spiro to keep the new computer off the market. The businessman turns the tables, however, ambushing Artemis, stealing the device, and leaving the boy's faithful and heretofore impregnable bodyguard Butler mortally wounded. To save Butler's life and recover the C Cube before Spiro can use it to dominate the world, Artemis must contact his old enemy and unwilling ally, Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon fairy police, for aid. He must also get help from Butler's half-trained sister Juliet, a decidedly loose cannon, and a foul-mouthed dwarf thief named Mulch. Readers who made the first two Artemis Fowl books bestsellers will also enjoy this latest installment, which again features Colfer's trademark broad humor, engaging if flat characters, and high-speed action, not to mention the unlikely mix of magic and technology. The series continues to be a good read but lacks the depth found in the fantasies of Diana Wynne Jones or J. K. Rowling.-Michael Levy. 3Q 5P M J Copyright 2003 Voya Reviews

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