Reviews for Have a Hot Time, Hades


Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 November 2002
Gr. 3-6. The first book in the new Myth-O-Mania series hilariously relates the story of the rise of the Greek gods, using Hades, the ruler of the underworld, as her narrator. As Hades sees things, Greek myths as they are known today sprang from the viewpoint of Zeus, Hades' younger brother and ruler of the universe, who is actually a prevaricating, cowardly braggart. Speaking in contemporary vernacular, Hades tells "the truth" about what happened, including the birth of the gods and the overthrow of their father, Cronus, leader of the Titans; the first Olympic games; and the division of world rule (Poseidon rules the sea; Hades, the underworld; etc.). Hades' slang and irreverence will engender lots of laughs from those who know the "real stories," and McMullan has managed to work in quite a bit of information about Greek mythology. Kids who find tales in their more familiar versions not to their liking might be encouraged to read McMullan's spunkier version, then go back to learn more. ((Reviewed November 1, 2002)) Copyright 2002 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2003 Spring
Hades, ruler of the Underworld, is angered over being cast as the bad guy in ancient mythology. He strives to set the record straight in first-person narratives describing his jealous battles with Zeus and his relationship with the cell phone-carrying Persephone. This satiric spin presumes that readers know the original myths; if not, they may find the stories humorous but confusing. [Review covers these Myth-O-Mania titles: [cf2]Have a Hot Time, Hades![cf1] and [cf2]Phone Home, Persephone![cf1].] Copyright 2003 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 2002 June #2
"Mythology" becomes "Mirthology" in this hilariously revisionist account of the war between the Greek gods and the Titans. Outraged by the version of events promulgated by his boastful little brother Zeus in The Big Fat Book of Greek Myths, Hades enlists a (what else?) ghost writer to help set the record straight. True, Sky Daddy Cronus did eat his children Hades, Hera, Demeter, and Poseidon, but it was their mother Rhea, not Zeus, who supplied the herbs that made Cronus finally barf them up. Similarly, when the gods needed help against Team Titan in the Olympic Games' climactic kickstone match, it was Hades who not only sprung allies from an underworld jail, but saved the day again when mighty Typhon attacked. And how did Zeus repay the debt? By cheating Hades out of Rulership of the Universe in a crooked poker game. Is it any wonder that Hades took a gig in the Underworld-"It's my job to make sure that the ghosts of those who were good in life get to go to an eternal rock concert. . . . The ghosts of the not so good? They have to wander around, trying to memorize an endless list of really hard spelling words. And the ghosts of the wicked? You don't want to know"-to escape all of his squabbling sibs? The disgruntled deity promises more exposÚs (" 'I think I'll call it Phone Home, Persephone!' ") to come. The sooner the better. (Fiction. 10-13) Copyright Kirkus 2002 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved

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School Library Journal Reviews 2003 January
Gr 4-7-Beginning with sibling rivalry in the stomach of Cronus and concluding with Hades's one-way trip to the underworld, McMullan describes all sorts of adventures among the quirky pantheon. Full of puns and other wordplay, the narrative romps along as Hades tells a self-centered "true" story of how the gods and goddesses came to take their roles. As with any parody, full enjoyment requires a basic understanding of the traditional tales. This book, the first in a proposed series, could be a boon to teachers seeking to enliven the study of myths.-Pat Leach, Lincoln City Libraries, NE Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.

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