Reviews for Don't Let the Barber Pull Your Teeth : Could You Survive Medieval Medicine?


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2012 Spring
This series puts a comedic focus on the smellier, nastier aspects of life in medieval Europe. Each chapter covers a different topic and is balanced between the sensational and the informative. Humorous illustrations keep things lighthearted and fit well with the overall theme. Some of the information is repeated across volumes, with Castle being particularly redundant. Reading list, websites. Glos., ind. [Review covers these Ye Yucky Middle Ages titles: Don't Let the Barber Pull Your Teeth!, Sweaty Suits of Armor, There's a Rat in my Soup, and Ye Castle Stinketh.]

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Library Media Connection Reviews 2011 November/December
This series introduces reluctant readers to the trials and hardships of those who lived in the Middle Ages. Thorough coverage is provided, and students will come away with a good base of knowledge about medieval life. Although some concepts and practices are touted as "yucky" by current standards, the authors are non-judgmental. The tone is light and conversational; chapters often start out addressing the reader as "you" to draw students into the narrative. Illustrations are comical in nature, but they also illuminate the concepts presented in the text. This series is sure to hold reluctant readers' attention, and they will come away with a better understanding of medieval times. Bibliography. Glossary. Websites. Index. Michelle Glatt, Librarian, Chiddix Junior High School, Normal, Illinois. RECOMMENDED ¬ 2011 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2011 November

Gr 3-4--Gross is king in this entertaining series. The volumes are filled with garbage and germs, weird foods and scary medicines, and stinky suits of armor. The details are a part of the real history of the Middle Ages, and the selected topics are sure to appeal to trivia buffs and fans of potty humor. Quoted primary sources confirm that the authors aren't making this stuff up: firsthand accounts acknowledge the less-pleasant aspects of life. The fantastic and funny art amps up the humor-the only shame is that several images are reused across the series. Topics overlap in the text as well, but each book provides a full picture of its subject, and readers are just as likely to giggle when they encounter yucky details a second time.

[Page 68]. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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