Reviews for True Mountain Rescue Stories


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2011 Spring
Each volume in this well-organized series describes several true-life rescue stories. The books' layout is less engaging than the subject matter; there are no illustrations and the pages of text may be daunting for reluctant readers. The writing, while accessible, is sometimes awkward in its melodrama (Jessica McClure: "a curious eighteen-month-old toddler with a near fatal attraction to an abandoned well"). Reading list, websites. Glos., ind. [Review covers these True Rescue Stories titles: True Ocean Rescue Stories, True Wilderness Rescue Stories, True Mountain Rescue Stories, and True Underground Rescue Stories.] Copyright 2011 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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VOYA Reviews 2011 February
True Rescue Stories is an interesting series. Even though the reader may become overwhelmed by the battering ram of fatalistic statistics, the heartwarming survivor stories soften these harsh realities. The stories span the globe from the Appalachian Trail to Nepal. Especially miraculous is the story of Saving Private Wilson. He was the lone plane crash survivor of an army training mission. Even though he became an amputee, "he had done more and better things with his life since the (1944 bomber) crash than most people would accomplish in a life without the burden of artificial limbs." From heroic rescues to amateur attempts, these life experiences will grip the attention of even the most reluctant reader. Like a vamped-up version of the Discovery Channel, there is a myriad of sensational facts as well as basic safety tips. Each title in the series lists additional reads. Last, but not least, the end section of each book has a "words to survive by" glossary. This recommended nonfiction series not only increases the reader's vocabulary, but also encourages the reader to learn more.-- Madelene Rathbun Barnard. Copyright 2011 Voya Reviews.

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VOYA Reviews 2011 April
True Rescue Stories is an interesting series. Even though the reader may become overwhelmed by the battering ram of fatalistic statistics, the heartwarming survivor stories soften these harsh realities. The stories span the globe from the Appalachian Trail to Nepal. Especially miraculous is the story, "Saving Private Wilson," from Scherer's True Mountain Rescue Stories. Wilson was the lone plane crash survivor of an army training mission. Even though he became an amputee, "he had done more and better things with his life since the [1944 bomber] crash than most people would accomplish in a life without the burden of artificial limbs." From heroic rescues to amateur attempts, these life experiences will grip the attention of even the most reluctant reader. Like a vamped-up version of the Discovery Channel, there is a myriad of sensational facts as well as basic safety tips. Each title in the series lists additional reads. Last, but not least, the end section of each book has a "words to survive by" glossary. This nonfiction series not only increases the reader's vocabulary, but also encourages the reader to learn more.--Madelene Rathbun Barnard.Jankowski, Susan. True Ocean Rescue Stories. ISBN 978-0-7660-3665-9Young, Jeff. True Underground Rescue Stories. ISBN 978-0-7660-3676-5From a ship lost in the heat of battle to a baby trapped in a well, Young and Jankowski regale readers with tales of survival that will amaze even the most reluctant readers. Adventure-seeking literary enthusiasts need not look beyond this informative series of books, tailor-made for an interesting and satisfying read. Those who enjoy these mini-masterpieces will be moved by the accounts of the stunning rescues that show how well it pays to lend a hand to someone else. These books are a must-have for thrill seekers, fact-lovers, and the adventurer in all of us. 3Q, 4P.--Angi Barnard, Teen Reviewer Copyright 2011 Voya Reviews.

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