Reviews for Romeo and Juliet


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2014 Spring
Cleaving to Shakespeare's words and dramatic arc, Hinds (The Merchant of Venice) creates another splendid graphic novel, tracing each scene in taut, coherent dialogue. The characters, in period dress modified by a few more contemporary touches, are poignantly specific yet universal. Hinds delivers the play's essence and beauty, its glorious language, furious conflict, yearning love, and wrenching tragedy.

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2013 #6
Cleaving to Shakespeare's words and his dramatic arc, Hinds (The Merchant of Venice, rev. 7/08) creates another splendid graphic novel, tracing each scene in taut, coherent, and expertly deployed dialogue. Hinds's characters, in period array modified by a few more contemporary touches, are poignantly specific yet as universal as this tragic tale of young love demands. Romeo, African, is big-eyed, appealing, impetuous, inno­cent; Juliet, a patrician Indian, is as tall as her lover and a bit more mature, as thirteen-year-old girls are wont to be. Other characters are well differentiated (fiery Tybalt sports tattoos; Mercutio, dreadlocks); helpfully, there's a pictorial Dramatis Personae. Expertly pacing the drama with varied frames, often with sharp, action-propelling angles, Hinds explicates and amplifies Shakespeare's story on every page, including wordless fight scenes that highlight pivotal details. An extensive note discusses casting and sources, including Hinds's imaginative use of historic and present-day Verona. From swirling action to subtly delineated emotion, he delivers the play's essence and beauty, its glorious language, furious conflict, yearning love, and wrenching tragedy. This is not only a wonderfully accessible introduction to a full text or (better yet) theatrical production; it's a visual delight for anyone. joanna rudge lon Copyright 2013 Horn Book Magazine.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2013 November

Gr 8 Up--With his latest graphic novel, Hinds once again shows his considerable talent for adapting classic stories for modern audiences. The most notable change between this story and Shakespeare's original is the creative license that Hinds takes with ethnicity-he makes the characters of African, Indian, and Caucasian descent in order to promote the universality of the story. The Shakespearean language is abridged but not adapted into contemporary English; footnotes explain words that could be confusing to young audiences. The use of lines and colorful watercolors is striking, especially when illustrating action such as dancing and sword fights. The cover provides one of the best advertisements for the book, showing readers a multiracial spin on this classic play. And one of the most memorable panels illustrates how, when Romeo first sees Juliet, the image he had in his mind of Rosalind literally shatters. Hinds also offers visual cues to the dialogue through his artwork; for example, as a character refers to maidenheads, he pops a cherry off its stem. The author's note explains which aspects of the story were strictly Shakespearean and which were adapted for modern audiences.--Andrea Lipinski, New York Public Library

[Page 123]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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