Reviews for Bedtime for Bear


Booklist Reviews 2010 October #2
Bear needs everything just so at bedtime. When his friend Mouse arrives for a sleepover, he tries to be accommodating, but Mouse's bedtime toothbrushing, humming, and whispering put him out of sorts. Unable to sleep, Bear hears a shuffling sound that frightens him, and in the end, he is glad that his resourceful friend is there. Children will see their own nighttime fears mirrored in Bear's expressive face and body language. The watercolor, ink, and gouache artwork captures all the drama and gentle humor of this gracefully written tale, which reads aloud well. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2011 Spring
Mouse sleeps over at Bear's house. The evening passes pleasantly, but when it's time for bed, Mouse's presence sets Bear's nerves on edge ("'Remember, I must have absolute quiet,' reminded Bear. 'Oh, indeed,' said Mouse"). When Bear hears a worrisome "rustly, moany sort of thing," though, he wakes Mouse up for company. Denton's nimble line bolsters the humor of the friends' well-choreographed routine. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2010 #5
"'Remember, I must have absolute quiet,' reminded Bear. 'Oh, indeed,' said Mouse." Mouse and Bear's friendship has come a long way since A Visitor for Bear (rev. 3/08). In this installment, Mouse has actually been invited to sleep over at Bear's house. The evening passes pleasantly, but when it's time for bed, Mouse's presence sets Bear's nerves on edge. The two perform their now-familiar dance: Mouse irritates Bear, Bear becomes increasingly agitated, Mouse escalates, Bear finally explodes in fury, Mouse retreats. Bear's change of heart takes place when he hears a worrisome "rustly, moany sort of thing" and wakes Mouse up for some company. The illustrations' subdued colors temper Bear's anxiety, first about all the noise, then about what might be lurking under the bed. Denton's nimble line bolsters the humor of the friends' well-choreographed routine. By now, readers know what to expect from this odd couple, and that's exactly what makes each encounter so entertaining. kitty Flynn Copyright 2010 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2010 July #3

Bear and Mouse return to prove that friends may not be perfect, but they're there when it matters most. Bear can't stand noise at bedtime, so he isn't pleased when Mouse turns up to spend the night. Mouse's humming, squeaking, and whispers of "Good night!" make Bear lose his patience, but when the house at last falls silent, Bear discovers that having everything just so is less important than having a friend when nighttime sounds turn scary. Denton's ink and watercolor illustrations ably express the dry humor of Becker's dialogue and personifications, which make this a bedtime standout. Ages 5-7. (Sept.)

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School Library Journal Reviews 2010 August

PreS-Gr 1--Bear and Mouse are back and charming as ever. Bear needs everything just so and perfectly quiet at night, so when his friend shows up for a sleepover, he is wary. All goes well until Mouse's noises disturb him. Then Mouse falls asleep, and Bear hears something. Awakened by his worried friend, Mouse goes along with his host's premise that it was he who was frightened and checks under the bed, etc., finally settling in for a bedtime story. Ultimately both fall asleep together. In a perfect marriage of illustrations and text, Becker and Denton portray Bear as skeptical, then irritated, and, finally, nervous. Unflappable Mouse, with his satisfied smile, is a perfect foil. With lines like, "'I am here to spend the night!' exclaimed Mouse with a happy wiggle of his whiskers," and "'You'll want a bedtime story, I expect,' said Bear. 'For your nerves,'" Becker's clever text imbues the characters with personality and the story with humor. Denton's watercolor, ink, and gouache artwork brings them to life. With just a few lines, illustrations take Bear from annoyed to frightened and Mouse from sleepy to awake. In a combination of full-bleed spreads, full pages, and spot art, they draw readers through the story. For children who are frightened at night, trying to navigate the world of friendships, or facing new experiences, Bear and Mouse are the perfect companions.--Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT

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