Reviews for Gingerbread Pirates


Booklist Reviews 2009 September #2
On Christmas Eve, Jim and his mother bake and decorate a batch of pirate-shaped cookies, including peg-legged Captain Cookie. That night, the intrepid captain, who heard Jim's mother suggest leaving out "pirates for Santa Claus to eat" and hopes to save his crew from "that cannibal," makes his way to the living room. When Jim awakens on Christmas morning, he finds beside the tree a wonderful model pirate ship manned by wooden pirates who curiously resemble the cookies made the night before. Large in scale and dramatic in effect, watercolor-and-gouache paintings create believable settings, sometimes seen from unusual perspectives, and sympathetically portray the characters, especially the pirates, whose icing-sugar mouths and eyes are surprisingly expressive. Children will enjoy knowing more about Christmas than the pirate captain, who bravely charges himself into a situation he doesn't understand and challenges an unexpectedly benevolent foe. Fine for reading aloud, this secular seasonal story combines pirates and Christmas in a childlike, imaginative picture book. Copyright 2009 Booklist Reviews.

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ForeWord Magazine Reviews 2009 September/October
No springerle or Russian teacakes at Jim's house-on Christmas Eve they make gingerbread pirate cookies for Santa. Now that's a mom! Jim's Pirate Cookie is terribly worried though: who is this Santa Claus who wants to eat his crew? Cookie's-eye-view illustrations and a story enlivened with dialogue make this boy's version of the Nutcracker sparkle. Preschool though elementary. ©2009 ForeWord Magazine. All Rights Reserved.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2010 Spring
A pirate captain gingerbread man refuses to accept his crew's fate on the plate of the season's most notorious cookie eater, Santa. In the end, Santa steps in to teach the pirates about the true nature of Christmas, graciously forgoing his snack. Tavares's vivid watercolor and gouache paintings dramatize Kladstrup's lively text with vigor in this imaginative adventure story. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2009 #6
On Christmas Eve, a pirate captain gingerbread man (with a toothpick for a peg leg) refuses to accept his crew's fate on the plate of the season's most notorious cookie eater, Santa. Captain Cookie's quest to rescue his crew from their cookie-jar imprisonment is not without peril, and humorous obstacles abound, including an encounter with a mouse that leaves him weaponless (his gingerbread cutlass is devoured before his eyes) and a pervasive confusion as to what Christmas is all about. In the end, Santa steps in to teach the pirates about the true nature of Christmas, graciously forgoing his snack in their favor and granting Captain Cookie his wish -- to become the captain of a toy pirate ship. Tavares's vivid watercolor and gouache paintings dramatize Kladstrup's lively text with vigor in this imaginative adventure story. Copyright 2009 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2009 September #2
Captain Cookie is a gingerbread pirate, leader of a batch of buccaneer cookies baked by a boy named Jim and his mom. On Christmas Eve, a plate of the gingerbread pirates is left out for Santa, and Captain Cookie tries to save his men before they are eaten. When Santa arrives, he promises not to eat the pirates and shows them what he has left under the tree: a pirate ship. Captain Cookie and his men take over the ship, and during the night they are transformed by Christmas magic into toy pirates to complete Jim's Christmas present. Illustrator Tavares handles this transformation subtly, and children will enjoy marking the switch from cookie to toy. An extra-large format makes this a fine choice for reading aloud to a group. (Picture book. 3-6) Copyright Kirkus 2009 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2009 October #4

A boy makes a gingerbread pirate crew on Christmas Eve; his mom leaves most of the pirates for Santa, but the boy takes the captain to his room. As the boy sleeps, the captain--sporting a ruffled shirt made of icing and a toothpick peg leg--makes his way downstairs ("Where's my crew? he wondered. And who's this Santa Claus who wants to eat them?"). Luckily, Santa ends up being a friend who gives the pirates a ship of their own. Swashbuckling gusto and a poignant finish should make this a new favorite. Ages 4-10. (Sept.)

[Page 56]. Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2009 October

PreS-Gr 3-After Jim and his mother bake pirate gingerbread men for Santa's snack, toothpick-legged Captain Cookie undertakes a daring rescue of his crew from the hungry-but understanding-Santa Claus, who works a magical transformation. When Jim awakes Christmas morning, he finds under the Christmas tree not only a magnificent toy pirate ship, but also a peg-legged captain and crew onboard. An exciting story and full-page, dramatically composed paintings depicting harrowing adventures with a mouse, a cat, and the crew imprisoned in a cookie jar make this a good holiday read-aloud.-Maureen Wade, Los Angeles Public Library

[Page 81]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

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