Reviews for Here's a Little Poem : A Very First Book of Poetry


Booklist Reviews 2007 April #1
/*Starred Review*/ With lots of hugs and kisses, as well as messy nonsense and uproarious action, this big, spacious anthology of more than 60 poems is a wonderful first book to read with babies and toddlers over and over again. As with nursery rhymes, the sounds of the words are a big part of the fun ("Oh soggy greens, I hate you / I hate your sloppy slush"), and so are the movements from dawn to bedtime, as in "Getting Dressed" ("You've one trouser leg / And two legs in it"). The clear, active, mixed-media illustrations show very young children outdoors and in; morning to bedtime; loving, teary, absurd, furious. The intense scenarios range from tantrums ("No! No! No! To everything!") and jealousy about the new baby ("What's she want another one for?") to slurpy kisses and lullabies. Many of the best children's poets are included, from Rosemary Wells and Mary Ann Hoberman to Jack Prelutsky; and there are adult poets too--Langston Hughes, Gertrude Stein, and more. Unlike in Mother Goose, the slapstick here is always child-centered, from "Mud, mud, glorious mud" to the unforgettable parody "Happy Birthday to you / Squashed tomatoes and stew." ((Reviewed April 1, 2007)) Copyright 2007 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
This collection includes sixty-one poems, arranged thematically, that celebrate a child's day. The well-selected pieces include familiar works and some that are lesser known. The poems' varied rhythms and rhyme schemes, child-friendly wordplay, and age-appropriate topics make this book a good starting point for sharing poetry with young children. Dunbar's lively mixed-media illustrations bounce and tumble over the pages. Ind. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
This collection includes sixty-one poems, arranged thematically, that celebrate a child's day. The well-selected pieces include familiar works and some that are lesser known. The poems' varied rhythms and rhyme schemes, child-friendly wordplay, and age-appropriate topics make this book a good starting point for sharing poetry with young children. Dunbar's lively mixed-media illustrations bounce and tumble over the pages. Ind. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2007 January #5

Here are , actually, 61 little poems, which together provide a high-spirited, engaging introduction to poetry. Gleaned from various countries and representing a refreshing array of voices, the poems fall into four categories of high interest to youngsters: "Me, Myself, and I," "Who Lives in My House?," "I Go Outside" and "Time for Bed." The selections include waggish nonsense verse, rambunctious action rhymes, quieter passages, and snippets of everyday life. Margaret Mahy's "My Sister" typifies the collection's airiness and spunk: "My sister's remarkably light,/ She can float to a fabulous height./ It's a troublesome thing,/ But we tie her with string,/ And we use her instead of a kite." Other contributors include the volume's two anthologists, plus Langston Hughes, Margaret Wise Brown, Eve Merriam, Jack Prelutsky, Charlotte Pomerantz and Lilian Moore. Dunbar's signature cheery, mixed-media art injects new energy into even the most familiar poems; her interpretation of A.A. Milne's "Halfway Down," for instance, portrays a girl on a staircase that seems to spiral up to heaven, while the girl on "The Swing" by Robert Louis Stevenson looks suspended from the clouds, over a collage countryside of textured cloth patterns. This elegant, oversize treasury features children as endearing as the verse they illustrateâ€"well, except perhaps for "The No-No Bird" perched in "the Tantrum Tree," a boy with wings aflame and mouth open in a scream. There's something for everyone here. Ages 6 mos.-5 yrs. (Mar.)

[Page 70]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2007 April

PreS-K-- Many collections of poems that purport to be for very young children are actually for primary graders. This oversize book really is for preschoolers. The poems, one per page, are arranged in four categories that encompass child's a world: "Me, Myself, and I," "Who Lives in My House?," "I Go Outside," and "Time for Bed." The poetry is witty, intelligent, and well crafted, and perfect for the target audience. The list of contributors reads like a who's who of children's poetry--Margaret Wise Brown, Nikki Grimes, Aileen Fisher, Jack Prelutsky, and others. Almost all of the selections have appeared in print before. Most of them are only a few lines long, and are printed in large informal type in a variety of colors that match the illustrations. The art was created using a wide range of mediums and techniques, and Dunbar blends them seamlessly to create charming images that are amazingly expressive. The children in them are carefree and happy and the book as a whole suggests a world that is safe and secure. Here's a Little Poem is a great way to introduce the youngest listeners to the genre.--Donna Cardon, Provo City Library, UT

[Page 127]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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