Reviews for No Place Like Home


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Fall
Tired of his "dark and dull" burrow, Mole, from [cf2]Bringing down the Moon[cf1], gets help from Hedgehog, Squirrel, and Rabbit to find a "bright and beautiful" replacement. But after quickly testing and finding fault with his friends' suggestions, Mole learns that there is really no place like home. Cabban's cheerful watercolor illustrations infuse life into this overfamiliar but sweet lesson. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2005 March #1
Taking full advantage of the fact that even the most trite sentiments will be new to young children, Emmett and Cabban send the mole introduced in Bringing Down the Moon (2001) off to find a new home that's "BIG and BRIGHT and BEAUTIFUL." Gamboling through open, idyllic woods and meadows, Mole tries out alternatives offered by fuzzy friends Hedgehog, Squirrel and Rabbit. After discovering that a hollow log is BIG but drafty, an abandoned treetop nest is BRIGHT but precarious, and a streamside cove is BEAUTIFUL but wet, he returns to his spacious, well-lit, comfortable burrow, quoting the title line as if it were his own. Such similar but more adventuresome quests as Eric Carle's House For Hermit Crab (1987) or Liesel Moak Skorpen's We Were Tired Of Living In A House, illustrated by Joe Cepeda (1999), have far more to offer readers than this bland, superficial outing. (Picture books. 4-6) Copyright Kirkus 2005 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Library Media Connection Reviews 2005 August/September
Mole is looking for a new home. Leaving his hole he checks in with friends Hedgehog, Squirrel, and Rabbit who, of course, have great recommendations for a new abode. Each falls slightly short of what Mole is searching for as one is too windy, another too high, and the third too wet. Reminiscent of Kenneth Grahame's famed character, Mole finds that his own hole is snug, safe, and dry and that there is no place like home. Colorful and bright illustrations show the animal friends cavorting through the forest and meadows searching for just the right place for Mole. Pastel tones remind the viewer of a balmy spring day while close-up renditions of the animals' faces make it easy for even the smallest listener to tell just how the animals are feeling. This is a cozy story for a quiet lap-time or great for a group read-aloud as everyone guesses whether the newest iteration of house is the home for Mole. Recommended. Pam WattsFlavin, Children's Librarian, Robbins Library, Arlington, Massachusetts, and Professor, Lesley University © 2005 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 February #4
PW said of Bringing Down the Moon, the book that first introduced winsome Mole, "In Emmett's unadorned, gentle prose, Mole seems enchanted by the moon's ethereal beauty." In No Place Like Home by Jonathan Emmett, illus. by Vanessa Cabban, the fellow wakes up dissatisfied with his burrow, wishing to live "somewhere big and bright and beautiful instead!"-until his search for the perfect home brings him right back where he started. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2005 March
PreS-Gr 1-One morning, Mole decides that he is tired of living underground. He wants to live someplace that is "BIG and BRIGHT and BEAUTIFUL instead." His friends, Hedgehog, Rabbit, and Squirrel, help him look for a new home, but he finds problems with each suggested location. In the end, Mole returns to his old home because it feels just right. Children will love these cozy characters, and Cabban's lush, grass-green watercolors are a perfect reflection of their world.-Kelley Rae Unger, Peabody Institute, MA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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