Reviews for Stink: the Incredible Shrinking Kid


Booklist Reviews 2005 March #1
Gr. 2--4. The pesky little brother in McDonald's popular Judy Moody series gets his own book and tells his own story here. Little is the word for James ("Stink") Moody; he's short, the shortest kid in his second-grade class. Is he shrinking? Judy is his bossy older sister, but he learns to handle her. For Presidents' Day, Stink's hero is not big tall Lincoln but another James, James Madison, the shortest president ever. The narrative is fun and laced with puns--from Mt. Trashmore to "newt in shining armor," and it's peppered with black-and-white illustrations, including comics ("The Adventures of Stink") reflecting Stink's triumphant fantasies. Stink sometimes seems younger than his years, so try this as a read-aloud for preschoolers or kindergarteners fed up with big, bossy types telling them what to do. ((Reviewed March 1, 2005)) Copyright 2005 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Fall
The team responsible for the Judy Moody series devotes a book to her younger brother, Stink, who laments being short but finds reassurance in the historical example of the vertically challenged James Madison. The story line includes an unnecessary detour involving Stink's class's pet newt, but the zippy, punning dialogue is sure to please. Black-and-white illustrations, including Stink's running comic strip, appear throughout. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2005 April #1
Judy Moody's little brother Stink, a.k.a. James, finally gets his turn. He uses it to obsess about his height-especially after he loses a quarter of an inch between morning and night (as does everyone, he later learns). He also records unfortunate incidents with hair-gel dye, the class newt and a sink drain, and an all-too-shrinkable wig intended to kick his report on James Madison, the shortest President and so, not coincidentally, his favorite, up a notch. Presented in large type on small pages, enhanced with plenty of Reynolds's black-and-white ink-and-wash drawings, plus comics contributed by Stink himself, and ending on a triumphant note, this makes fine fare for fledgling chapter-book readers. Stink definitely measures up to his memorable sister. (Fiction. 8-10) Copyright Kirkus 2005 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Library Media Connection Reviews 2005 August/September
Calling all Judy Moody fans. Stink features Judy's little brother James, more commonly known as stink because he is small like a stinkbug. Stink faces several problems in the book including losing the class newt down the garbage disposal (with Judy's help), thinking he is shrinking when a nighttime measurement shows him to be 1/4 inch shorter, and a report due for President's Day-for which he picks James Madison, who was also short. The tale is full of laughter, creativity, and the closeness, in spite of everything, of the Moody family. Author Megan McDonald's style is light and humorous but very realistic in its portrayal of children. Between chapters are cartoon stories showing "The Adventures of Stink" as his imagination gets a hold of the events. These and the other illustrations fit well with the style of the text. The book has several curriculum connection possibilities including character education, president studies, and zoology studies. Beyond that, it's just plain fun to read. Recommended. Betsy Ruffin, Librarian, Cleburne (Texas) Intermediate © 2005 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 February #4
This spirited launch of a new series focuses on Judy Moody's younger brother, Stink. But Judy's fans will be pleased that she plays a pivotal role here. Each day she pulls out a tape measure to learn whether Stink-the shortest kid in his second-grade class at 3' 8"-has finally grown. After one such session reveals that her brother has shrunk, Judy suggests he apply gel to make his hair stick up so he'll look taller, which turns his locks bright orange. The lad believes his luck is changing when the teacher draws his name to care for the class pet, a newt, for a weekend. Alas, another of Judy's attempts to help results in calamity: when the two are cleaning the newt's cage, the pet disappears down the kitchen sink and Judy accidentally flips the switch for the garbage disposal. Yet the quick-thinking girl assures Stink that the creature likely slipped down the pipes to safety ("Think of it like Stuart Little. He's probably sailing down the river right now on a raft, having a big, fat, newt adventure"). For a President's Day assignment, Stink eschews Washington and Lincoln to write about James Madison, the "shortest presidentever" (his family shows their support by throwing the boy a James Madison Day party). "The Adventures of Stink," silly comic strips hand-drawn by the boy and positing him in various superhero roles, add little to the plot but may well attract reluctant readers. McDonald's breezy narrative and likable characters will keep Judy's followers amply amused and recruit new fans. Ages 5-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2005 April
Gr 1-2-"Short, shorter, shortest!" Stink, the younger brother of the ever-popular Judy Moody, is shrinking. In the morning he was exactly one quarter inch taller than he is that night. For the shortest second grader in his school (maybe in the world), this is a disaster. What can he do? Judy suggests stretching him out, but he decides to take his mother's advice and eat his peas instead. However, Stink has other worries as well, such as a disastrous weekend caring for his class's pet newt. Then, a President's Day project allows Stink to shine as he shares all he knows about his favorite president, James Madison, who was also short. Delightful full-page and spot-art cartoons and playful language in large type bring the child's adventures to life. "Things are definitely looking up, up, UP" with this bright addition to beginning chapter-book collections.-Deanna Romriell, Salt Lake City Library, UT Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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