Reviews for Shiloh Season


Horn Book Guide Reviews 1997
Marty's voice is consistently strong and true in this sequel to [cf2]Shiloh[cf1] (Atheneum), as he faces the frightening consequences of his ""bargain"" with Judd Travers, the man who gave Shiloh to Marty in exchange for his silence about Judd's illegal out-of-season hunting. The tension is well paced, but scenes of Marty's family life add comfort and contrast. [cf2]Shiloh[cf1] fans will be well served by the sequel. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Horn Book Magazine Reviews 1996 #6
Marty's voice is consistently strong and true in this sequel to Shiloh, where he faces the consequences of his "bargain" with Judd Travers, the man who gave Shiloh to Marty in exchange for his silence about Judd's illegal out-of-season hunting. Judd has been drinking hard and growing increasingly reckless with both his truck and his gun, and Marty fears that he'll declare a "Shiloh season" any day. The tension is well-paced as scary incidents involving Marty and Judd pile up. But the scenes of Marty's family life add comfort and contrast; there's dry humor as well, as in a scene of flying rumors the day after Judd's dogs get loose and run amok: "By the time that bus rolls into the driveway at school, we have cats missing, babies missing, girls with their arms torn clear off their bodies, and a whole pack of men.all out lookin' for Judd Travers." A touch of deeper substance is added when some of life's big paradoxes ("I tell the truth, and look at what happens") are naturally integrated into the story without preaching. Shiloh fans will be well served by the sequel. e.s.w. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Magazine Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 1996 July
~ Seeing Judd Travers illegally shoot a deer gave Marty Preston the leverage he needed to win ownership of an abused dog in Naylor's Shiloh (1991); now Judd has taken to drink and become even more trigger-happy than before, and Marty frets that the man will declare open season on Shiloh out of spite. After homily-heavy conversations with his dad--the wise local doctor and a veterinarian--Marty tries to understand why Judd is so vicious (it's close to parody: Travers speaks almost entirely in wild threats, and Marty sees him wing a squirrel and watch it slowly die) as he explores his own feelings, looking for something better than simple hatred. When Travers suffers a serious--but thanks to Shiloh, not fatal--accident, Marty makes peace with him at last through persistent acts of kindness. The story's focus blurs during repeated discussions of the difference between truth and rumor, and in a series of secondhand reports on a senile grandparent's exploits; the dialogue sounds right out of made-for-TV movies. Still, readers will find Marty's anxiety, and his love for Shiloh, engrossingly genuine. (Fiction. 10-12) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1998 April #3
In this second book in Naylor's Shiloh trilogy, the formerly abused beagle and the boy who rescued him fear the abuser's return as hunting season approaches. In a starred review, PW noted, "Naylor maintains the previous work's lump-in-the-throat vibrato." Ages 8-12. (Apr.) Copyright 1998 Publishers Weekly Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1998 April #2
In this second book in Naylor's Shiloh trilogy, the formerly abused beagle and the boy who rescued him fear the abuser's return as hunting season approaches. In a starred review, PW noted, "Naylor maintains the previous work's lump-in-the-throat vibrato." Ages 8-12. (Apr.)

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1996 July #1
It should startle no one that the prolific Naylor (the Alice books) should continue the boy-and-his-dog story begun in her Newbery Medal winner Shiloh?nor will fans be startled that Naylor maintains the previous work's lump-in-the-throat vibrato. As the novel begins, Marty Preston relishes the companionship of his beagle, Shiloh, at last protected from the abuses of his former owner, Judd Travers. But Marty's happiness is shadowed by doubts about the way he acquired the dog?through a combination of honest work and outright blackmail. When Judd takes to drinking and then to hunting on the Prestons' property, Marty worries that Judd will target Shiloh as his prey. Marty's conflicts are a bit more labored here than in the previous book, but Naylor so perceptively conveys the strength of his affections and the scope of his fears that she amply compensates for narrative shortcomings. She broadens the West Virginia setting to show Marty at school; in an especially graceful moment, Marty's teacher takes him aside and gently explains the different roles of "family talk" (i.e., Marty's vernacular) and grammatical speech. The author's sympathy for her characters, both the good guys and those who menace them, communicates itself almost invisibly to the reader, who may well come away hoping for a full-fledged Shiloh series. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) Copyright 1996 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1998 July
Gr 3-5-Young readers who have met Shiloh (Atheneum, 1991) will continue to love and sympathize with the delightful beagle as new concerns and adventures develop which strengthen the relationship between Shiloh and owner, Marty Preston, more than ever. As a sequel to the 1992 Newbery Medal winner, Shiloh Season (Atheneum, 1996) exposes the best and the worst of human nature and the natural consequences of each. Although Marty has honestly earned Shiloh from his evil and mean neighbor, Judd Travers, Shiloh may still be in danger because Judd disregards the law and kills animals irrationally out of season. Will there be a Shiloh season? It could be any time with the reckless and often drunk behavior of Judd. Listeners will notice a remarkable change in behavior when Judd realizes that Shiloh saved his life. The dramatic reading by Michael Moriarty heightens the emotions of love, hate, anger and kindness which permeate the story. Young listeners will also identify easily with the innocence of Marty, and will empathize with the difficult situations he faces to protect his family and to save Shiloh. This reading will evoke lively discussions on a variety of topics-boy/dog relationships, family responsibilities, integrity, good character development and long-lasting virtues. This reading will enhance any language arts curriculum. Young readers will not want to miss the last of the Shiloh trilogy, Saving Shiloh (Atheneum, 1997).APatricia Mahoney Brown, Franklin Elementary School, Kenmore, NY

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School Library Journal Reviews 1996 November
Gr 3-5-Picking up where Shiloh (Atheneum, 1991) left off, this is a less powerful, but still satisfying sequel. Judd Travers is just as nasty as ever; someone has been playing pranks on him, and he is convinced it is Marty Preston. Worse yet, the man still considers Shiloh his dog. Knowing that he acquired his beloved beagle by blackmailing Judd, Marty worries that he will get the dog back. When the boy asks Doc Murphy if he did the right thing, the Doc wisely replies, "...what's right in one situation, may be wrong in another. You have to decide-that's the hard part." In a love-your-enemy style conclusion, Marty realizes that the only way to resolve the situation is for him to try to understand and forgive Judd.. The moral predicaments are not as complex as in the previous book, but the tension never lags and Marty and his supportive family are likable. Martyr's ambitions for education within the context of his working-class family are nicely handled, and Naylor skillfully develops the character of evil Judd and then makes his final affectionate gesture both understated and believable. This is sure to be popular with both able and reluctant readers.-Caroline Ward, Nassau Library System, Uniondale, NY

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