Reviews for Harriet the Spy


AudioFile Reviews 2001 October/November
Anne Bobby delivers this Harriet the Spy mystery in a spunky preadolescent voice. The funny and odd characters whom Harriet meets are accurately represented as a full cast of unique personalities. Harriet is on the case of the mysterious note-leaver, and her innocuous antics get her into some thought-provoking trouble. She and her friends are performed authentically as they laugh, screech, cry and complain. Bobby delivers these preteens convincingly as they uncover an important social issue. Although the story itself is a bit dated, this presentation will be enjoyed by Harriet fans young and old. D.L.M. ¬ AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine

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AudioFile Reviews 1999 October/November
Harriet wants to be a writer, so she writes down in her notebook everything she sees and hears on her daily "spy route." She innocently piles up details about her friends and neighbors. All is well until her notebook is discovered by her classmates and read aloud, and Harriet must deal with the consequences of her spying. In this reading Anne Bobby is especially adept at maintaining Harriet's kid voice, even though the novel is not told in the first person. She switches voices well, especially among the kids, so the readers can keep them straight. Beyond that, she keeps the pace of her reading moving along smoothly. P.B.J. ¬AudioFile, Portland, Maine Copyright 1999 AudioFile Reviews

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School Library Journal Reviews 1999 July
Gr 3-6-Louise Fitzhugh's novel (HarperCollins, 1964), comes to life in this superbly narrated recording. Harriet M. Welsch, an intensely curious and intelligent 11-year-old, aspires to be a writer when she grows up. Encouraged by her nurse, Ole Golly, she practices for this future vocation by spying on people on her after-school route and writing about them in her secret notebook. She is a keen observer of all that goes on around her as she tries to make sense out of life. When her classmates find her notebook and read her painfully blunt comments about them, Harriet finds herself an outcast. Even her best friends, Sport and Janie, desert her. Harriet has to find a way to win back her friends without giving up her own individuality. The narrator varies the voices of each character so clearly and consistently that listeners can picture their distinct characteristics as well as their eccentricities. The sound quality is very crisp, and the narration is always energetic with precise enunciation of every word. This recording of one of the best children's books ever written will be an excellent addition to any school or public library collection.-Kristina Aaronson, Bethel Elementary School, , VT Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1999 August
Gr 3-5-Harriet is determined to become a famous author. In the meantime, she practices by following a regular spy route each day and writing down everything she sees in her secret notebook. Her life is turned upside down when her classmates find her notebook and read it aloud!. By Louise Fitzhugh. Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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