Reviews for Three Little Rabbits : A Balkan Folktale


Booklist Monthly Selections - #2 February 2002
Ages 5-7. In this Balkan versions of the Three Little Pigs, three rabbits venture out into the world with a firm warning from their father: dig safe rabbit holes that will protect against the fox. The first two rabbits are young and fearless. They don't follow their father's advice, and narrowly escape the fox. The third rabbit is wiser; he digs a hole as advised, and he outwits the fox, who gets his head stuck in the burrow. The rabbit and the fox strike a deal: the fox will be released if he promises to leave the other rabbits alone, giving them time to dig their own safe havens. The large, bright watercolor illustrations and the familiar themes make this a natural for preschool story hours. ((Reviewed February 15, 2002)) Copyright 2002 Booklist Reviews

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2002 Fall
This version of ""The Three Little Pigs"" has three rabbits setting off on their own. Dizzy with their new independence, only one heeds their fatherÆs warning to dig a burrow for a dwelling. She alone is safe from a hungry fox and must scheme to protect her brothers. Although the story is moralistic, the delicate, unusual artwork is appealing. Copyright 2002 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 2001 December #1
Glorious watercolors in a distinctive style are the highlight of this Balkan variation of "The Three Little Pigs," retold by Gantschev (Where the Moon Lives, 1998), who attended art school in Bulgaria and now lives in Germany. His style effectively uses the nature of watercolors to their best advantage, with softly shaded rabbits and vibrant, artfully blended hues in trees, grassy hills, and cloudy skies. The folktale closely parallels the familiar plot of the pigs and the wolf, substituting three rabbit siblings and a wily fox. The two rabbit brothers build shoddy shelters and must run away from the hungry fox. In a welcome twist, their sister works hard to dig a proper burrow as instructed by their father, and it is her burrow with its tiny entrance that outfoxes the fox. The story is simply told in fine fairy-tale fashion that will work well for reading aloud to a group; double-page spreads show off the superb illustrations that carry it far beyond the average. Its straightforward telling makes this an ideal candidate for compare-and-contrast lessons with the traditional pig and wolf story in elementary classrooms. A pleasant diversion. (Picture book. 3-8) Copyright Kirkus 2001 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2002 February #2
In The Three Little Rabbits retold by Ivan Gantschev, trans. by J. Alison James the Balkan version of the Three Little Pigs a bunny mother and father warn their now-grown offspring to "dig yourself a safe rabbit hole" in case "a fox comes around." But only one bunny takes the time to do it right. The others, tormented by the furtive fox, learn a life-changing lesson. Gorgeous watercolors seem to bloom on the page, like their peak shades in spring. (Jan.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information. #

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