Reviews for Clemency Pogue : Fairy Killer


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Fall
"I don't believe in fairies!" Clemency repeatedly yells in an attempt to banish the bad fairy who is stinging her with a wand. The fairy drops dead, and Clem learns from a cranky hobgoblin that her incantations have also killed six other fairies. So begins Clem's journey to make amends in this overwritten though amusing story. Black-and-white illustrations appear throughout. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2005 May #1
This isn't much of a story, but it has a certain cleverness, and it includes an irresistible scene of a bad little boy tearing apart a set of sofabed cushions, peeing on them, and then being stuck inside the folded, wet and shredded bedding. But we digress. Comprising equal parts Jasper Fforde and Lemony Snicket, the ten-year-old heroine Clemency slaughters an annoying stinging fairy by pulling the Peter Pan line about not believing in fairies. Unfortunately, by dint of repetition, she's killed a handful of other fairies, too. A hobgoblin named Chaphesmeeso (this is a plot point, we swear) gives her the opportunity to make amends in Siberia, Utah and a few other places. The wordplay ranges from adorable to lame ("Clemency was aghast. In fact . . . two ghasts"). Petty is not above snurching from Cyrano de Bergerac (the golden bell hung in my heart poem is straight out of Rostand) nor a little heartfelt preaching: "Reading's human magic." Tasteless and mildly amusing. Try it on the ten-year-olds. (Fiction. 8-12) Copyright Kirkus 2005 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 June #1
Inanity abounds in Petty's debut novel, a snippet of a tale that borrows from the sagas of Peter Pan and Rumpelstiltskin. After a nasty fairy stings Clemency repeatedly with a burning wand and causes the 10-year-old to tumble into a deep gorge, she recalls that there was "in the story of the little boy who never grew up, instruction for the extermination of fairies" and declares, "I don't believe in fairies!" Because she utters this sentence seven times, Clemency inadvertently kills not only the fairy tormenting her, but six others as well. A hobgoblin appears and, when Clemency unknowingly utters his name and becomes his master, he agrees to accompany her to the sites of the fairies' demises. Tunneling through the earth at a rapid pace, the two visit the children whose lives have been affected by the diminutive creatures' deaths, including a boy in Salt Lake City who woke up to find that the Tooth Fairy hadn't retrieved his tooth-and was lying dead on his pillow; a lovesick lad in Brazil whom the Fairy of Love and Tenderness was helping to write a poem to his beloved when that fairy was struck dead; and a girl in Siberia whose infected ear contains a pea and the body of the Fairy of Noninvasive Surgery, who had died while attempting to remove the legume. Though Petty works some clever wordplay and comic elements into his narrative, readers are likely to find Clemency's path to reversing the curse lengthy and laborious. Ages 8-12. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2005 April
Gr 3-6-Clemency Pogue is a good listener, which is why she knows what to do when a malicious fairy attacks her in the woods. Remembering an incident from Peter Pan, she cries out, "I don't believe in fairies!" Unfortunately, she utters those words seven times before the fairy falls down dead, and a hobgoblin pops up to inform her that six other fairies have been slain as well. After Clem inadvertently utters the hobgoblin's secret name, placing him in her power, the two set off into the world to find the fairies' true names and bring them back to life. Despite the occasional self-conscious attempts to be overtly glib, this satire of "tough fairy" stories … la the "Artemis Fowl" books (Hyperion) is lighthearted, with touches of mischief and merriment. Davis's black-and-white illustrations add to the accessibility of this short, action-filled tale.-Farida S. Dowler, Mercer Island Library, WA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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