Reviews for Lucinda's Secret


Horn Book Guide Reviews 2004 Spring
Siblings Jared, Mallory, and Simon learn more about the mysterious book in their possession when they visit elderly Aunt Lucinda, who is confined to an asylum. The trio then discovers the book has been stolen by a nemesis. Populated with elves, faeries, and unicorns, this heavily illustrated story will appeal to fantasy fans though it lacks a real beginning and ending. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2003 September #5
In The Spiderwick Chronicles Book 3: Lucinda's Secret by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black, siblings Jared, Mallory and Simon, having escaped goblins and trolls, are now being harassed by a house boggart. Mallory thinks the only way to stop the madness is to get rid of the Guide. And the only person who can help them is their strange old Aunt Lucinda. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2003 November
Gr 3-6-Simon, Mallory, and Jared Grace know that faeries are real-and that they aren't always the charming creatures portrayed in popular fairy tales. Ever since they discovered Arthur Spiderwick's Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You, the Grace family has been surrounded by magical beings with decidedly hostile attitudes. They have a wounded griffin convalescing in the carriage house, a spiteful house boggart playing malicious tricks, and even weirder oddities lurking around practically every corner. Hoping to learn more about the book and its long-vanished author, the kids decide to consult their Great-Aunt Lucy, Arthur's daughter. She has been hospitalized ever since she was attacked by faerie beings who suspected that she knew where her father's book was hidden. She warns that the family will be in grave danger if they remain at Spiderwick Estate. When the siblings find an old map that leads into the elves' secret forest, their aunt's grim prediction seems all too plausible. The story ends with a cliff-hanger, to be continued in book four. There is some background exposition, but familiarity with the plot and character relationships from the earlier volumes is assumed. The black-and-white Arthur Rackhamesque illustrations add a satisfyingly eerie note to this mock-gothic tale, which will be best appreciated by readers who have followed the "Spiderwick Chronicles" from the beginning.-Elaine E. Knight, Lincoln Elementary Schools, IL Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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VOYA Reviews 2003 December
The third installment of the Spiderwick Chronicles introduces aged Aunt Lucinda Spiderwick, who is being kept in an asylum. Readers of the first two volumes will realize that living with the assortment of magical creatures inhabiting the SpiderwicEstate would be enough to send anyone around the bend. Aunt Lucinda is the daughter of the mysterious Arthur Spiderwick, who wrote the Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You and subsequently disappeared. The children then try to solve thpuzzle of Arthur's disappearance. Mysteries are never straightforward when there are so many magical elements involved, and the mystical cast increases with this volume, bringing the Grace children, Molly, Simon, and Jared, into contact with a phookand a contingent of devious elves. This book is much more enjoyable if the reader is following the series; as a stand-alone, the portrayal of the characters and incidents falls a bit flat. But the detailed line illustrations continue to transform the series into something specialAlthough the narrative is contemporary, the intricate drawings lend a feel of an old, beloved book recovered from grandmother's attic. This book will primarily appeal to the youngest of the young adult audience, perhaps the same readers who enjoy thLemony Snicket books.-Diane Emge 3Q 3P M Copyright 2004 Voya Reviews.

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